Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello. For the past year or so I have been playing my Jody Jazz HR 7* and while I am very happy with it comfort wise I feel like I am getting to a point where my influences are changing and this mouthpiece is just really not suiting my needs. After a little bit of research I think maybe the best option for me would be to possibly order a Otto Link STM and if I dont like it return it as no music stores around me carry Links for me to test. My question is however will it be hard to adjust to a metal mouthpiece? I know my embouchure might have to change as the general feel of it is much different. Any thoughts? Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,794 Posts
It's very personal, of course. Material doesn't matter, except as it affects the profile and beak of the piece.

I'm an HR guy, but recently tried a vintage Berg tenor. It's a bit picky with reeds, but sounds great--raunchy, with really unusual enveloping, easy altissimo, and such volume. Perfect for R&R or R&B. . . .

But it also demands a real adjustment in embouchure. After a few months, I just can't get used to the slimline profile or feel of the metal, and have been drifting back to my higher-baffle HR pieces. Even a fat plastic Metalite feels better to me than the metal Berg--and sounds really good too, in its own way.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2013
Joined
·
7,355 Posts
When making such a drastic change don't order anything. Go somewhere and try things out.

You might find that you're actually more comfortable on HR but the design of the mouthpiece is what you need to change. It is in fact what matters more than the material.

However, some people just can't wrap their lips around metal. Others like me can't stand HR.

Try before you buy.

Best of luck.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
4,160 Posts
it's a big change. Some people like it, others hate it. I prefer the feel of metal and can't stand HR mouthpieces. I have a several, but try to avoid using them.

To the OP, what do you think the STM is going to give you that the HR* won't? Part of the problem with STM's is the inconsistency in finishing so you may well get one that plays like crap because the rails and tip aren't even. I know the two that I've had ended up getting sent to Mojo to clean up. Didn't do anything other than make it like it was supposed to be from the factory and the difference in before and after was night and day. Unfortunately that's not cheap to do. In this case I think you're best off going somewhere to try a bunch of mouthpieces before you buy. It can get expensive trying to find one if you're just shipping them back and forth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
976 Posts
I think the STM is one of the most comfortable tenor metal mouthpieces, so that shouldn't be that big of a deal. It may/probably need to be refaced. If it doesn't sound like you want, you'll keep looking. Don't buy something you don't like, to start with.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Technician
Joined
·
21,030 Posts
I assume for tenor. The Link is probably the easiest to go to in metal as it is fairly fat on the outside compared to the slimlines. I think the more important issue is that a Link is quite different from the Jody. I agree that you need to try them first. As to metal, I only like them for tenor as on alto and others, just too brittle sounding.....only one opinion!
 

·
SOTW Member
Joined
·
3,394 Posts
This is difficult, I played a Guardala on tenor for almost 20 before I bought a Black Widow rubber, now I have a modern Vigilante metal that feels best, Previous rubber I played were Lakey..again slimmer I think than the Widow.
 

·
SOTW Columnist, Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
23,007 Posts
As most of the posts imply, the primary things you'll need to adjust to are any changes in beak profile and overall size, along with whatever design differences there are (facing, baffle, tip size, chamber). So it's not so much the change in material, although in general metal mpcs tend to be slimmer than HR mpcs.

Really, the only way to find out is to try the mpc you want to switch to. And if you think it has potential and like it enough to hang onto, give it some time to make the adjustment. I think with mpcs especially, you have to play one over a period of time (weeks to months) to play it to its fullest potential.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top