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Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2008
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
..and do most modern horns benefit from the advances made by those models?
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
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No.

The best horns are no longer made by the major companies. All the improvements that came after that were merely changes.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2008
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That's it? That's the final word on the matter? Wow Doc must have a lot of clout! I thought the debate would rage for weeks..
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2013
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MK VI tenor
There ya go...rage on!
 

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Yep, not much happening in the tenor world since then - in fact, they didn't even know when to stop making changes on the Mk VI.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I've got to admit Thomas the first time I tried a Mark VI I was blown away by the action. The sound didn't really blow me away as much as the action. It was setup beautifully, smooth and fast.
 

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Alan, I own two Selmer tenors (a SBA and SA 80, see >here< for more details and a soundclip) and both have a very good action. The SBA (1952) seems to run smoother and easier than the SA 80 (1983), but the SA 80 feels a bit better for certain keys (thump rest, Eb and low C key, left hand pink keys). I think those are the (small) improvements on more modern horns. On the other hand, I still prefer the old horns much more for sound, general key execution and feel. So I fully agree with the comment of Doc G in post #2.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2012
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The "extreme" horns have progressed more than alto & tenor since the MkVI age, bari and sop mostly under the initiative of the Japanese manufacturers. This includes keywork advances, but also ease of response and intonation (specially on soprano).
Of course, most current oriental stencils include those design features (eg "Yanagisawa copy"), for 1/3 of the price.
Some unique features remain unique, like the anti-sticky-G# on Keilwerths.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I don't know who moved this thread to the Evette & Schaeffer Buffet-Crampon section but they are way off..this thread is about which make produced the model with the best action and I only included the 'Super-Dynaction' as a possible contender to consider along with other makes and models with 'action' as part of their model names.
 

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There you go - both ends of the spectrum. I guess we're done.
 

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If you want to speed up the action of the keys take one part of any old 2 in one oil and mix it with one part of silicone oil. The thinner the mix the better. The combination of the two is just unreal its so slick. Keep it shaken as you oil the rods and the pivot joints. Reason this works is that the oil and silicone oil do not like each other and are incompatible with each other kind of like oil and vinegar salad dressing. When the 2 come together they lubricate against each other and provide the ultimate friction resistance and lubricity. I have been using this combination for years. You can also make it more compatible by adding 1/2 part of mineral spirits. Once you apply it and the mineral spirits evaporates off the same effect takes place. As you lubricate each rod or section press the key or keys down really fast several times to get this mix into the joints. I have been a research chemist for over 30 years. Hope this helps someone out. Let me know.
 
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