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im having a few problems i want to correct before the end of the summer but unforturnately, i have begun to burn out.

so heres are my problems that need inovative work to fix

1: I jumped from a 4C yamaha MPC to a vandoren T7, in other words i went from no opening to very large tip opening.

as a result i'm having trouble getting my mid and high range notes in tune and in control. What are some exercises i could routeinly do to improve this other than a new mpc because i dont have 150 to shell out again.

2: my emborcheereeresrfcer is suffering. My attack is too strong and my inhaling is strained. I try to use a Tah vocalization.

Thanks for all contributions! i apreciatie all of em
 

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Exercise #1 - sell your T7 and buy a cheap mouthpiece in a smaller tip opening
Exercise #2 - practice with the mouthpiece that is the product of exercise #1

Problems solved!
 

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How long have you been playing? I may be wrong, but looks like your T7 IS the time waster.
 

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I agree that the new mouthpiece is the problem. Why not just use the 4C, they are very good mouthpieces.

The time to get a new mouthpiece is either

  • When you try one out and know it is an improvement, and without the kind of issues you are having, or
  • When you are having identifiable problems with your current mouthpiece, ie you know exactly what you are looking for in a different mouthpiece

If you get a larger tip the things to especially look out for are: intonation, ease of quiet dynamics, especially low notes.
 

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I agree that the new mouthpiece is the problem. Why not just use the 4C, they are very good mouthpieces.

The time to get a new mouthpiece is either

  • When you try one out and know it is an improvement, and without the kind of issues you are having, or
  • When you are having identifiable problems with your current mouthpiece, ie you know exactly what you are looking for in a different mouthpiece

If you get a larger tip the things to especially look out for are: intonation, ease of quiet dynamics, especially low notes.
There you have it. To the OP: if you don't want to listen to me, at least listen to a very knowledgeable and experienced member who knows exactly what he's saying. Still a time waster?

It's funny, you diagnosed your problem in your own original post, so the solution should be obvious to you. It's like a child saying: "Lately I've been eating too many cookies and I've gained too much weight. What should I do?" :)
 

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I made a similar jump when I was fairly new to saxophone (I went from a Selmer C* to a Lamberson J7 (.110 tip opening)) when I was about a year and a half into learning to play. I did it because I was having problems with the C* closing up even when I went to fairly stiff reeds, this was at least partly due to some deficiencies in my playing but also because some of the sounds I was going for weren't suited to the C*. I also did it for some, in retrospect, silly reasons such as not wanting to be playing on a "beginner" piece (even though I was clearly a very rank beginner) and that my favourite player was playing on a similar piece. The change set me back for some time as I tried to come to grips with the bigger piece, but I am stubborn if nothing else and after a lot of long-tones I made it work. I've since moved to a slightly more open version of the same piece which I actually have found to be easier for me to play. I'm still pretty much a beginner but I am happy with my mouthpiece now.

The short answer is that if you really want to make the new piece work there is no substitute to working on long-tones and just lots of practice time on it. There are no shortcuts and you will most likely set yourself back in terms of progress on the horn for a while, so if you want to make the piece work that's what you will have to do. Oh, one other thing, from what I've read these pieces are generally pretty good but from what you've written you're in no position to evaluate it right now so if there is a problem with the piece (or if it just doesn't suit you) by the time you realize it it will be too late to do anything other than sell it on the open market.
 

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Pick up an Otto Link, the New Vintage Tone Edge model in around a 6 or 6* opening. The T7 doesn't play well for me either, and I have been playing tenor exclusively for 6.5 years.
 

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im having a few problems i want to correct before the end of the summer but unforturnately, i have begun to burn out.
It's good to set goals, but 'before the end of summer' might be a bit unrealisitic if you're talking about "problems with getting mid and high range notes in tune and in control," and an "attack that is too strong and inhaling strained." AND an issue with mpcs. That's a lot to tackle, and not at all unusual, especially if you're a relative beginner. You don't say how long you've been playing, so it's hard to offer any specific advice.

How long have you been playing? Do you have a teacher?
 

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How long have you been playing?
Should have gone to specsavers JL!

One year but eight on clarinet (post 5)

I know it sounds harsh but I would almost discount the 8 years on clarinet. The more you can divorce clarinet technique from saxophone technique the better. It can actually be a problem for some people who approach the saxophone as if it's just a clarinet but with easier fingering and fewer squeaks.
 

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Should have gone to specsavers JL!

One year but eight on clarinet (post 5)
.
Oh man, you're right about that. Gotta get my reading glasses adjusted, or my observation skills tweaked. I think the term "emborcheereeresrfcer" set me reeling!

Back to the OP, if you've only been playing sax for one year, the problems you're having are to be expected. Get a good teacher if you can, but keep working at it. A mpc change won't solve it. We all made the same mistake in our youth of thinking a year is a long time and surely we should be able to play like Bird after two whole years!

And yeah, when I was kid and went from clarinet to sax I had to learn how to play all over again! Not that I could play the clarinet that well to begin with...
 

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How about T6, CarlHeanerd?
Still too open, it's closer to .100". I don't care for the design as much either, it's not as easy speaking as an Otto Link down low.

The others have a point though, practice would fix these problems too. Also a softer reed. Perservere!
 

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im having a few problems i want to correct before the end of the summer but unforturnately, i have begun to burn out.

so heres are my problems that need inovative work to fix

1: I jumped from a 4C yamaha MPC to a vandoren T7, in other words i went from no opening to very large tip opening.

as a result i'm having trouble getting my mid and high range notes in tune and in control. What are some exercises i could routeinly do to improve this other than a new mpc because i dont have 150 to shell out again.

2: my emborcheereeresrfcer is suffering. My attack is too strong and my inhaling is strained. I try to use a Tah vocalization.

Thanks for all contributions! i apreciatie all of em
I have a different opinion on that, partly because I did a similar thing when I was starting out and it came out fine, but mainly because I know from first hand what changing mouthpieces too often can do to you, i.e. distract you from "playing". Don't buy anything else for the next 3 years or so. Just go through it. Maybe experiment with softer reeds.
As for exercises this is from a member on here:
http://harderbop.blogspot.com/2011/07/getting-started-with-long-tones.html

Have fun!
 

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I know it sounds harsh but I would almost discount the 8 years on clarinet. The more you can divorce clarinet technique from saxophone technique the better. It can actually be a problem for some people who approach the saxophone as if it's just a clarinet but with easier fingering and fewer squeaks.
Agreed 100%!
 
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