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Distinguished SOTW Columnist and Saxophonistic Art
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Distinguished SOTW Columnist and Saxophonistic Art
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Tim,

Do you have a suggested tempo for your Saxophonitic Warm up... or do you leave that to us, who will try it?
 

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Distinguished SOTW Columnist and Saxophonistic Art
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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
RCNELSON said:
Tim,

Do you have a suggested tempo for your Saxophonitic Warm up... or do you leave that to us, who will try it?
RC- Try QuATER NOTE =60 to start ;from there you'll be cool.

60 will get the sound into your ears- and the note functions of the chords.

We all know, the need to practice and play on your instrument for a long time before you can easily express and play the music you want. I suggest you to listen great jazz musicians like Miles Davis,Cannonball, Prez ,Bird and many others. < BTW way transcribe anything- one of my students is doing Steve Cole stuff; another is doing Jr Walker; and Dexter always hits the spot; to hear is to see ya know! >
Some of these ear training exercises on SOTW of mine are very important to develop your art of improvisation. You do not need perfect pitch but you have to develop your hearing , with transcriptions ,and recognizing notes and chords. Music harmony and theory is a fundamental basis to create and improvise music. The saxophonist who does not ever transcribe is cutting some aspect of their learing short A capable student must be at adapting "new information" which comes through in so many varying shapes and forms...ONE OF WHICH HAS TO BE TRANSCRIPTION!!! The ability to hear/see the relationships of the art form and later to "make it personal and useful to your own situation." This has been proven to be universally valuable to any musician, regardless of their primary instrument.
THAT SAID, go at 60= quarter note , will aid the ear AND the fingers via the connect between each.

LATER- when you do transcribe things will be more 2ed nature and solid IMHO. For instance try ; LESTER YOUNGS SOLO...on " Pound Cake". You'll have fun and develop your improv skills stronger via hearing and technique.

BTW- on transcription- the writings of David Liebman are spot on;
READ _HIS_ words below -
TRANSCRIBING

How does one learn tone, nuance and develop a true jazz sense of rhythm? Certainly there are exercises and method books which can help a student attain these goals, but there is a built in elusiveness to these concepts meaning they are seemingly impossible to notate in any convincing fashion. The best approach is exact aural and tactile imitation-the first stage of artistic growth. In jazz as mentioned earlier, the most valuable form of imitation is direct master-apprentice work in which the live model (master) demonstrates directly to the student for immediate and exact repetition until mastered before moving on. Learning in this way becomes a natural outgrowth of exposure and reinforcement on the spot. But without that opportunity, I have found transcription is the next best method. Some musicians object to transcribing as stealing other people’s ideas. My contention is that in one way or another, whether it be as detailed as I will describe or as casual as Charlie Parker supposedly standing outside of a club in Kansas City hearing Lester Young and then going home with phrases in his ear and mind to practice and recall, most artists have done something of this sort. And the best players are usually the ones who will tell you immediately that so and so was their main inspiration and they began by copying him. This is a process-a means to and end and to my mind very necessary. I have a video titled “The Improviser’s Guide to Transcription” (Caris Music Services) which describes the process in detail with actual demonstrations. Transcribing involves the three part learning apparatus mentioned above: body, mind and spirit-in that order. Being an auto didactic system, the process involves the student 100% in his own work with tangible and measurable rewards a teacher as the guide if present at all. It is exhaustive, complete and very satisfying in that the results can be immediately perceived in most cases as directly related to an improved time feel and more subtle use of nuance. Transcribing is like learning how to speak a language, similar to when one travels to a country where he may have studied the language in school. Finally a student can hear the way the language is actually used and pronounced rather than written by being immersed in a foreign culture on a day to day basis.


They are avail here;
http://www.upbeat.com/lieb/Feature_Articles/Philosophy.htm

Scroll down to read the transcription essay.

In any case; this should help you!!
 

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Thanks Tim!
Very useful stuff. I couldn't take my tenor to Europe, only the Martin alto. For the past five nights, I have been working on getting my tenor embouchure back. Will practice what you posted. One whole month without my tenor, ouch!!
Candy
 

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Thanks ever so much, Tim, for the free lesson you just gave us all.
 
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