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Forum Contributor 2016, Distinguished SOTW Member
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One of my computer speakers is blown and sounds like crap. It's hard to listen to my mouthpieces clips and write about what I am hearing when the sound is this bad. I have the Klipsch desktop speakers you can buy in most stores but I really would like to upgrade. Any suggestions out there? I've been looking at Audioengine A5+ speakers. Any other thoughts or other suggestions?
 

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Audioengine has been one of the best available. But if you want to save a bit, I've heard the A2+ is nearly as great with less cost associated.

You can save even more checking out the Edifier R1280DB or Fluance Ai41.

Or go with some less bookshelf style speakers like the Bose Companion 2 or Harmon Kardon Soundsticks 4.
 

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You can save even more checking out the Edifier R1280DB or Fluance Ai41.
I also have Edifier, model R1600III. Nice sound, great value. Play much better than all these popular brands from big net shops, like Logitech for example. I'm, well, sort of an audiophile ;), with nice valve amplifier in the main system, quite a good floor standing loudspeakers, separate DAC and so on... And I can live with these cheap Edifiers connected to my computer.
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Tenor sax from YT recordings sounds OK to me :)

One problem with Edifier, at least for some people: it's made in China (but what isn't these days...:().
 

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Hi Steve. Considering the rather high level audio stuff you are working on, I'd have thought you have an external audio interface and active studio monitors. Costs more than computer speakers, but would be my choice when it comes to work with real instruments.
I'm using a Behringer UMC202HC interface to record my saxes and guitars. I do the quick and dirty pre/post-production on the onboard speakers of my iMac, and the more detailed work and recording with an AKG studio headphone. I do have a pair of active monitors I used until recently, but was too lazy since our latest relocation to set them up again. Don't even remember the brand....

Note to myself: install those monitors, man, they'll make things easier !
 

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Steve, I'd definitely recommend a pair of decent studio monitors, and there are plenty that are affordable these days! I've had my Yamaha HS5 pair for about eight years and they're kind of unbeatable for the price, but the JBL equivalents are very solid too. I assume you already have some sort of audio interface, but if you don't, even the cheap ones are pretty good these days.
 

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I moved up to the Behringer S1000 wireless speakers to use with my computer and am very pleased with the sound quality. I believe they are a great value for the price. The only thing about them I don't like is that they don't have a headphone jack that cuts the sound to the speakers that makes recording more convenient.

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Audioengine are just okay. If you can afford it, I highly recommend going with a pair of powered studio monitors - Yamaha HS5 , KRK Rokit 5 G4, Genelec 8013C are some well-regarded speakers. Aside from the Genelec (which are truly amazing), these run about $400 USD/pr. They will be WAY better than any consumer PC speakers that you'll find.
 

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For the price, it is hard to beat the Klipsch Promedia 2.1. I've had a pair as my shop sound system for over a decade, used most of the day every day, and they just keep going. I am snobby about sound and these do the job weirdly well.

Usually can be found for around $100.

Edit: I also enjoyed building these for my son recently, and they sound pretty good to my ears: C-sharp powered speakers
 

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Steve, I'd definitely recommend a pair of decent studio monitors, and there are plenty that are affordable these days! I've had my Yamaha HS5 pair for about eight years and they're kind of unbeatable for the price, but the JBL equivalents are very solid too. I assume you already have some sort of audio interface, but if you don't, even the cheap ones are pretty good these days.
I use a mackie inrterface and klm 8 studio monitors. Good sound.
 

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For the price, it is hard to beat the Klipsch Promedia 2.1. I've had a pair as my shop sound system for over a decade, used most of the day every day, and they just keep going. I am snobby about sound and these do the job weirdly well.

Usually can be found for around $100.
These are what I use as well for my everyday speakers, and they are fantastic. But Good Headphones do the heavy lifting for the extra important stuff like editing.
 

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Get the iLoud micro monitors.


I love to do a lot of composing and recording.

But one problem being a parent is that I can’t go to my private basement studio and work when supervising and watching the kids. I have some much more expensive monitors I have used and owned (JBL LSR 6328p and LSR 705p), but for the purposes of using on a small table upstairs, I needed something much less bulky.

I also wanted to go DAWless to simplify things and got a few multitimbral synths for writing music. So I now have a small table in the living room dedicated to making music when watching the kids in the afternoon and evening.

I just got the iLoud micro monitors a few months ago and was blown away by a lot. But especially the bass, it should technically be impossible for these small 3” drivers to put out so much and so accurately. In fact, they go so low that mixing is easy, and is comparable to results I get in my fully treated space downstairs with bass drivers that are 8”.

Now, the Stereo image is a bit narrow, but as long as you are in the sweet spot, it really blows me away. Good enough to use for jam sessions with my daughter inside the house too.

Yesterday was my first day transferring some files mixed upstairs on the iLoud downstairs to my DAW, and I was really surprised how well and consistent my mixes ended up between the two completely different sets of speakers, even though the iLouds are only like 1/5 of the price. In fact…I would say I might actually end up using the cheaper speakers more than the expensive ones, if that says anything. They are fun to work with! But wow, they are so small and cute…I really can’t believe the sound they put out!
 

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Or go with some less bookshelf style speakers like the Bose Companion 2 or Harmon Kardon Soundsticks 4.
I had the first gen SoundSticks and loved them! The SS4 seems to be unpopular because there's no separate volume control for the sub like there is for gens 1-3, so I've been considering a gen 3, but maybe there will be a SS4.5 or SS5 with volume control for the sub.

If more recent generations sound as good as the first I'd definitely recommend them, especially if you don't have a ton of space on your desk. Tiny footprint, great sound!
 
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I had the first gen SoundSticks and loved them! The SS4 seems to be unpopular because there's no separate volume control for the sub like there is for gens 1-3, so I've been considering a gen 3, but maybe there will be a SS4.5 or SS5 with volume control for the sub.

If more recent generations sound as good as the first I'd definitely recommend them, especially if you don't have a ton of space on your desk. Tiny footprint, great sound!
They do look great and very tidy. I have debated them for replacing my Klipsch 2.1 system since it's started popping at me randomly
 

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If you're using this set up for recording and monitoring, I would consider getting a digital to analog converter (DAC) with USB input, then run this to powered studio monitors. Many DAC's have a headphone output, which gives you all kinds of other options, as well. The AudioEngine, like any wireless speakers, are convenient and tidy but involve a sonic compromise and will not be as accurate as studio monitors. Depending on your purposes, this may or may not be worth worrying about. I'm worrying about it because I'm a little obsessive about sound reproduction.
 

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Just be aware that the Yamaha HS5 series are flat(ish) with a slight midrange bump and you need to learn how to use them of all the monitors suggested. JBLs with that Waveguide tech i.e. JBL 305P and other versions are easier because you do not have to in an optimum monitoring position like the Yamahas. KRK Rokits may be too bassy. But really depends what you want.

I do use the Yamaha's for my DAW desk. HS5 and HS8 and a subwoofer. I use the HS8 because of the bass response and you get a good sound without forcing you to sit in a monitoring position

For our living room -- I found these really good bookshelf from BIC, model FH-65B and they are like Klipsch but probably better. I bought a Denon receiver for cheap from CL - 40$ to power the BICs. That amp which has a lot of power, has optical and digital in and that's connected to our TV and media center i.e ripped MP3s and amazon music streaming. This was the cheaper approach than buying powered monitors and serves us party music source as well. I also have a subwoofer again CL buy for a few bucks like 35
 

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