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Discussion Starter #1
First, I want to say how much I'm enjoying the new horn, and this forum. I've found lots of great information here in a really short time.

I just got a new Yamaha YTS-62 II. I'm having trouble with a few notes, and I'm not sure how to diagnose it. Middle D and up, until I hit the A above it, are really stuffy or dead sounding and seem to create too much resistance on the reed (if that makes sense). In other words, everything else below and above that range comes out nicely, with a richer, fuller sound. I know that middle D can sound dead on many horns, and I've experimented with opening the palm key to liven it up.

I'm using the 4C mouthpiece that came with the horn, which I understand to be a pretty standard size. I've tried Rico Royal 2.5, Vandoren 2, and La Voz Soft reeds, several of each. The results are very similar in each case. (I found the La Voz's were actually not any easier to play, and the Rico sound was much better. The Vandorens sound great, but may be a bit hard for my experience level. I've been favoring the Ricos.) I've been reading the forum here as well as the Teal book, trying my best to make sure my embouchure is good....right amount of mouthpiece in mouth, good steady airstream, sealing the reed with enough pressure from the corners of the mouth, without biting down on the bottom lip. Not sure that I'm doing all of this, but I am conscious of trying to. I've practiced the "a to octave key a" exercise and that's going pretty smoothly. There's a little hesitation, but the tone shifts cleanly back and forth.

Otherwise, I have a couple of other observations:

1- Octave key G is the single toughest note on the horn. I can play down or up to it, legato or tongued, and it will sound. But if I try to sound that note by itself, it will often result in a shrill, odd tone. The G below it is fine, actually a joy to play.

2- Low D up to the F# above it sound fine, but will occasionally want to waver and break up, more so when changing from one note to another within this range.

I am going to have lessons soon, but it may be a while before I can go. Even though the horn is new, I wouldn't mind having a tech or experienced player look it over. (If anyone knows a good instructor or tech in the Nashville area, I'd love to meet them.) I put cigarette papers under the pads and did a resistance test, which seemed to show no leaks. The octave pads are working fine, as best as I can tell, clearing the octave vents nicely when engaged, and staying put when at rest. I've looked the horn over, and everything seems to be working fine. Of course, at my level there are many things I could be missing.

Many thanks for reading, and thanks for the forum!
 

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It seems to me you are doing everything you shold be doing. I think some of it may be your inexperience, but I would definitely take your horn to a technician, if for nothng else than to eliminate the instrument as one source of your problems. I would make that a priority. Also I would get to 2.5 reeds as soon as you can. #2 are pretty soft.
 

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My son's YTS-62 II plays easily through the entire range of the horn with no response, tone or pitch problems. But long ago, I experienced the same problems you are having on my old Bundy school horn. It turns out that the horn had a few very minor leaks but I didn't know it at the time. With practice, I had overcome most of these issues and I believed the problem was just me. Then after falling and dropping my poor Bundy, it finely got to go to shop for the first time in its life. The tech not only fixed the dents but also found and fixed the leaks. The difference in ease of play went from being like pushing a wagon full of rocks up a hill to riding in a smooth sports car.

So my advice is to have the horn check out by a good tech. Otherwise you may be teaching yourself some pretty bad and frustrating playing habits to compensate for possible leaks.
 

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your problem is in the octave key. the neck octave key is not closing all the way. try to play a octave g and hold the octave key closed on the neck with yior hand or just cover it with your finger and see if that is the problem. from middle d to ocave g that key should be completely closed.if this does not fix the problem then your body octave pip is probably blocked partially.
 

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Yts 62

I have a silverplated 62 that plays free from top to bottom. Actually it is really free blowing.

I tried the mouthpiece that came with the sax and man oh man was it stuffy .

After getting the sax checked out by a tech, try a few different pieces.

HUTMO
 

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I've had one of these for a year, I bought it on line and it played "straight out of the sealed box." Was yours on display in a store or like mine still in it's original carton with the seals intact? Maybe it has some unseen damage?
Shouldn't be a problem to fix, they play well and are quite robust in their construction.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all your responses! I was able to get a lesson quicker than I had anticipated, and I had my instructor check the horn out. He found it to be in fine shape. Having someone there to help with the embouchure was really good, too. I'm still trying to find that sweet spot between too little and too much grip on the mouthpiece.

I only wish I got the horn sooner! I forgot about all the fun I had playing in school, and I'm really having a great time with it!

Best Wishes,

Matt
 
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