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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys. Was n't sure whether to do two posts for this one but decided to combine them in case the two things are linked.

Have a TJ Horn Revolution II which I got new about a year ago. Nice sax and I am improving on it. Have tried a number of mouthpieces ligs and reeds and with differing results all allow me to play all the basic notes apart from D which, with or without the octave key, is very stuffy. Db and below are fine - Eb and above are fine.

I recently got a leak light and the pads are all fine but I have found a tiny (3mm long and literally thinner than paper) crack just on the inside of where the bell curves round.

It is very hard to see this crack with the naked eye and I would never have found it without the light. I have no idea how it was done or if I did it at all.

My questions
1. Could this be the cause of my stuffy D's.
2. If not then what are the likely causes.
3. Is a crack that small having any effect at all.
4. How can I fix it? (ideally without breaking the bank)

If you have an answer to any or allof the above please let me know. Don't be scared of patronising me as I actually know very little about this.

Cheers Colin
 

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If you want to do a quick test before taking it to a tech - cover the crack with tape (scotch tape should work fine) and see if D improves..
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the repilies so far.

Griff - I am in Northampton.

Can't take it back to the shop as I got it new on ebay. Good price but no long term guarantees. Anyway can't establish when it happened.

hgrail - will try the tape

axetech - if tape works will try epoxy - is a tiny amount of epoxy on the outside ok or would you do this on the inside?
What does "opening up the C key" mean?

Thanks again
 

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It would be better on the inside but it's your horn.
Sorry, open up the C key is to make that key more open from the tonehole. If the felt bumper has an adjuster on the key guard (C) you can unscrew it counterclockwise to achieve this. If not the bumper is just glued to the key guard then pick the bumper out and cut some (1/3) off and reglue into guard. This will bring the pitch up on the D.

Carl
 

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JerryJamz2 said:
Has anyone outside of the UK seen one of these Trevor James saxophones? Can anyone here comment on the same?
Yes. I don't think I can comment much because I didn't try to play it and didn't look at it much. I heard a student (playing for a couple years) play on his TJ alto and he sounded great. A local store here sell TJ (saxes and flutes). From the very little that I noticed it looked like a regular mediocre saxophone, not really great and not especially bad.
 

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Crack in "brass" sax=crappy materials. You might want to invest in a real saxophone.
actually Trevor James saxophones are real saxes. I've had a couple in my time, in fact I started out on a TJ Horn back in 1990 and theyre very nice English owned- taiwanese factory made, english assembled and padded saxes they range from student to pro models.
 

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Cadenza Music Woodwind & Brass. 113,Stimpson Avenue,Northampton, Northampton, NN1 4JW Tel: 01604 630485...

Go see Paul - at the very least he can comiserate - he can also fix saxes...
 

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I would force the epoxy into and through the crack, from the outside, then clean up the outside before it sets. The result should be a filled crack and a very small 'bead' along the inside.

I shorten bumper felts without taking the felt off. Use a VERY sharp knife - I use the snap-off type, with a new blade. (The sharper the tool, the less pressure required) Use a finger behind the felt and carefully 'saw' through the felt. Eyes and finger nerves are sufficient to stop at the right time before cutting into the finger. :) Of course it helps to have reasonably thick finger skin.
 

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Gordon (NZ) said:
I shorten bumper felts without taking the felt off. Use a VERY sharp knife - I use the snap-off type, with a new blade. (The tool, the less pressure required) Use a finger behind the felt and carefully 'saw' through the felt. Eyes and finger nerves are sufficient to stop at the right time before cutting into the finger. :) Of course it helps to have reasonably thick finger skin.
You also Gordon? Who needs cutting blocks when you got us? :D
 

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I'm surprised that in this theatre no-one has mentioned do not to touch it and take it back to the dealer. This is clearly a warranty issue IMO, unless the bell has been pushed backwards towards the main body tube and previously repaired which seems not to be the case here. I'd see what they have to say about it before you take it upon yourself in an attempt to fix it, but in the end, this might be reality. Just a thought.
 

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The horn was new a year ago - I'm not sure what kind of warrenty it came with - but I wouldn't hold my breath on this one.

"Good luck with that" is the phrase that comes to mind in this case.


Besides - this is one of the better "do it yourself" forums I have come across - (and I'm speaking across topics) Who doesn't like messing with their horn & even having it play better afterward (after some learning)..
 

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The one Trevor James alto that I worked on was a very well made saxophone. It is too bad there are not more of these in the U.S. A trick I learned from Curt Alterac when doing his panty hose fix is to heat the epoxy right after mixing with a hair dryer or heat gun on low. It makes the epoxy very thin and watery and much easier to flow into small cracks in a material.

John
 

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I think that if I were to attempt a repair on this instrument for longevity and solidarity, I'd take the bell and bow keys off the instrument, flip it upside down (bottom bow facing up) and using my Smith's #00 torch and 96/4 tin/silver solder, I'd fill the crack from the inside. No lacquer to deal with either. By heating from inside the bow/cracked area with the smaller torch tip and using the very strong 96/4 solder, which is almost the same melting temp as 63/37 (conventional lead solder), it's not very likely to damage the finish, (use flux very sparingly) and the 96/4 seam is stronger than the brass surrounding it, so it is less likely to fail at a later time. This method works well on brass tubing and bells, why not here?
 

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I've never had to do that with a sax, so I am only guessing here...

I suspect that this split is actually a failure where the two halves of the bow were brazed together. If it failed, then there is a good chance the surfaces were not clean, or have corroded since. I would not expect solder to stick unless I first went along that crack with say a 0.3 mm thick diamond wheel, to clean the surface.
 
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