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Are you saying that you're closing the key of the ring finger on your left hand, while playing C#? And are you talking about C# in the treble staff (as written), or two ledger lines above the staff?

I would just use the regular old all-open fingering for C#, myself.
 

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If the up/down of six fingers at one time is a problem, leave some of the right hand fingers down. Depending on the horn, this might end up giving a clear in tune C natural for some fingers, but I think for a Selmer it ought to be OK. This is what we often do on flute. I see, however, mention of the "typical flat Selmer C#" and this will probably make it worse.

If it's tonal, maybe use the "long" fingering, like low C# but with octave key?

It seems that the octave C#-C# is usually wide. Older horns seem to have been designed for the middle C# to be in tune, letting the upper one go sharp. Many older instruments have a little lever that partially closes the topmost pad of the upper stack when you press the octave key (especially on sopranos). This works quite well.

Then apparently Selmer decided to adjust the scale to make the upper C# better in tune, but this makes the lower C# tend flat.

Personally I'd rather have to bring down a sharp upper C#, either by voicing or by closing a key below it, than try to raise a flat middle C# by (what? Not easy either to lip it up and you can't lift any key above it, and it's well vented).
 
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