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I had a spring break out of a c melody I'm repadding, but the problem is that the bit left behind in the post won't come out. I've tried gripping it and trying to pull it out and I've tried using spring removing pliers. Neither work.
Is is safe to try and tap it out or will this damage the post or body at all?
I suppose I could try it, but I'd rather not cause myself even more problems.
Thanks guys.
 

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Usually works to use the sharp end of a smaller spring (from the broken end) and tap through. After a bit of penetrating oil, of course.
 

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"I had a spring break out of a c melody I'm repadding, but the problem is that the bit left behind in the post won't come out. I've tried gripping it and trying to pull it out and I've tried using spring removing pliers."

Pulling rarely works.

How well spring removal pliers work depends on how carefully the tip is centred on the stump, how flat the end of the stump is, and the type of pliers.
http://www.krausmusic.com/handtool/pliers.htm?zoom_highlight=pliers
I have found these are sometimes successful where other pliers fail, partly because of the parallel action, and partly because they operate deep into the post:
http://www.krausmusic.com/handtool/pliers.htm?zoom_highlight=pliers Scroll to 1187B Spring Install/Remove Plier.
They're not cheap, and sold only to technicians.

"Is is safe to try and tap it out or will this damage the post or body at all?"

Fine, but:

1. You must have a firm 'dolly', such as a heavy lump of lead or steel, on the other side of the post. (Lead allows the spring to still support the post while the end of the spring is banged into the lead.)

2. You have little control over what a punch does DURING the impact. It is highly likely to slip off the stump of spring, and embed itself in the softer neighbouring brass, making the spring tighter.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for all the suggestions. I'll give it another go with all that in mind.
Thanks again
 

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I use a center punch. It is one that I have grounded the point to a very fine point ,like a needle spring. Run a file over the end of the broken spring so you can see it. Set the very sharp point right in the center of it and tap with a metal hammer. The sharp point should stay there. The weight of the center punch seems to work well rather than a light spring.
 

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I, like Ken K use punches that I have ground and filed. Make sure, whatever implement you decide to use, that you heed Gordon's advice:

Use a dolly - I use a lead block, and be careful as you have litlle or no control over the punch.


I would also advise getting someone to hold the sax so that you have both hands free to limit any damage.
 

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"The weight of the centre punch seems to work well rather than a light spring."

That sure is true. It is also to do with the length-per-diameter of the spring. If you use a spring as a punch, it is far more successful to use a small length, soldered into a more substantial, punch-like handle.

Of course, a problem with any punch, is that in most cased you cannot get it perfectly in line with the stump of spring. This is a large advantage of the Kraus plier tool, with its parallel-action jaw, easily applied to any post.
 

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"..If the broken off end is flush with or slightly below the surface of the post clip off a short bit of the broken spring remnant and place it between the tip of the pliers and the stump so that when you squeeze it pushes on the spring in the post... "

That gave me an image of a circus act... one guy balancing on another guy balancing on another guy.

Bouquets to you if you can do that!
 

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Would it be easier to remove the post first?

If I were doing this (not that I'm an expert) but if the pushing it out with a longnose pliars and oil didn't do the trick - I would think about removing the post from the horn - and placing on top of my vise (perhaps with some brass blocks or something) and tapping it out with a punch or a junk spring.

Removing and replacing posts are easier than repairing dents in my world..
 

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JBT, have you tried the Kraus tool I linked to. Very nice.
 

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Gordon (NZ) said:
JBT, have you tried the Kraus tool I linked to. Very nice.
I would like to get that tool. I have seen it at the Convention. We just have the Allied pliers which are ok for most applications. I posted the link to Music Medic's tool because it is available to the "civilians". :)

John
 
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