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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In the middle of a song last night, the strap ring on my Barone tenor just broke off. I finished the song by propping up the horn on the tall stool I use for playing keyboard. Anybody else have a strap ring just break off? Any difficulty getting a new ring attached? I'll take it to my repair tech, but I'm now a little leery of attaching a ring. I don't think I can use the old one that broke.
 

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In the middle of a song last night, the strap ring on my Barone tenor just broke off. I finished the song by propping up the horn on the tall stool I use for playing keyboard. Anybody else have a strap ring just break off? Any difficulty getting a new ring attached? I'll take it to my repair tech, but I'm now a little leery of attaching a ring. I don't think I can use the old one that broke.
It happens. Did the ring break away from the base or did the whole thing come unsoldered from the body? In the first case you have to replace the whole thing and in the second you just solder it back on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The ring broke away from the base.
 

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The ring broke away from the base.
That is because the silver-soldering was poorly done.
Remove the base, prepare and re-do the silver-soldering, and re-attach the base to the body.
Not a big job, but expect lacquer to be compromised.
 

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That sucks.

Poor silver solder job for sure. Thankfully not a hard fix for a tech, just a silver solder and soft solder. The straightening out the rest of your horn might be more involved though, hope it didn't hot the ground hard.
 

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I can't imagine anybody going to the trouble to braze that junk back together - the tech can get replacements as its a common item. Also, he doesn't mention dropping the horn which indicates he had both hands on it when it popped - nice catch!
Martin, I know what you're saying - I hate those times when I just let a sax hang, especially a baritone. I never had a ring assembly pop off and I never even heard of the ring separating from the base - I guess those tenors are made in China so anything's possible.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·

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Well, I expect you've had it fixed by now. Personally I would replace the whole ring - it's cheap and that would be faster than brazing the broken one back together.

Honestly I am surprised that no one has duplicated the old Conn steel strap rings. Nope, just brass over and over again, and then if you use a steel strap hook it wears the ring out.

I mean, going off topic, there are a lot of non-acoustic mechanical improvements that have been used and then discarded for no apparent reason except maybe cost (which can't have been that much):

- nickel alloy rods on long key rods
- the steel strap ring
- Multiple improved designs of neck tenon-receiver
- Adjustable leverage on a couple of linkages such as front high F, to eliminate lost motion AND be able to regulate opening height

There are probably some others I can't remember right now.
 

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The flimsy longer key rods was the first thing I noticed on a “boutique” tenor. I don’t want to name them for the flames that ensue. Not to single one out but that’s probably the last Asian horn I bothered to try. I’m sure they aren’t alone in this issue. My old T4 Yanagisawa has this also. That and the fact the keys have a longer “throw” has them looking a little bowed. If you don’t pick the sax up just the right way you could bend these easily.
That was a few years ago so they may have remedied the issue.
 

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The flimsy longer key rods was the first thing I noticed on a “boutique” tenor. I don’t want to name them for the flames that ensue. Not to single one out but that’s probably the last Asian horn I bothered to try. I’m sure they aren’t alone in this issue. My old T4 Yanagisawa has this also. That and the fact the keys have a longer “throw” has them looking a little bowed. If you don’t pick the sax up just the right way you could bend these easily.
That was a few years ago so they may have remedied the issue.
It's not just "Asian": I had a Dolnet tenor that the rods were so skinny you could have called it the "sponge-o-matic". My Beaugnier bass I have added stiffening elements to several of the most floppy long rods just to be able to get the thing into a reliable adjustment.

For the life of me I can't understand why these manufacturers won't step up to the plate and at least pay the extra $2.00 per horn or so to go up one size on the diameter of those long rods.
 

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Weight?
 

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I can't imagine anybody going to the trouble to braze that junk back together - the tech can get replacements as its a common item. ...
From New Zealand (or any other smallish country, and probably quite a few biggish countries)...

Getting a replacement part:
- An hour or two to find a source and order it.
- Supplier quite likely turns me down because I am not a registered dealer or buying $200 minimum per year.
- Bank charges for the transfer of revenue.
- A likely very long wait for it to arrive.
- Huge shipping bill when they send it in a large carton.
- Extra charges for international customers.
- As often as not the wrong part arrives.
- If I keep some in stock then that stock is likely to have an average turnover of decades, hence should be expensive - expensive enough for the customer to massively grizzle.

Brazing... 5 minutes more work than just unsoldering the piece and soldering on a replacement.
A no brainer!
 

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From New Zealand (or any other smallish country, and probably quite a few biggish countries)...

Getting a replacement part:
- An hour or two to find a source and order it.
- Supplier quite likely turns me down because I am not a registered dealer or buying $200 minimum per year.
- Bank charges for the transfer of revenue.
- A likely very long wait for it to arrive.
- Huge shipping bill when they send it in a large carton.
- Extra charges for international customers.
- As often as not the wrong part arrives.
- If I keep some in stock then that stock is likely to have an average turnover of decades, hence should be expensive - expensive enough for the customer to massively grizzle.

Brazing... 5 minutes more work than just unsoldering the piece and soldering on a replacement.
A no brainer!
Well, those are all good points - it's easy to forget that not everyone is in the same location or country.

I did like the reference to "huge carton" - I too have received one little part in a giant box.
 
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