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Discussion Starter #1
Have posted this type of sound before but didn't get many comments. Getting used to the sound now but it's very different. Using a FMaj7 mouthpiece and a full curve neck on a straight sop. Result is deep resonant low tones with the higher register a little harder to control, but also tamed way down and quite mellow. Here's a short ditty totally improvised over a spontaneous loop with my usual guitarist. Comments welcome.

http://soundcloud.com/whampton-court/madam-of-madrid
 

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everything sounds nice the sound has a pleasant " splatter" (I use the term is a positive way ) quality to it and aside with one small passage there is no audible trace on any control issues. Nice piece of music too!
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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Hey Wade this is a really lovely sound. My only criticism would be that the vibrato is a bit too fast for my taste. Nothing wrong with fast vibrato per se, but what I prefer is when the vib is not so consistent, ie always there whenever there is a long note. This reminds me of Dixieland, but of course yours is much subtler than say, Bechet.

What is the soprano and what is the neck? I'm looking to try a fully curved neck on my straight soprano.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for comments Milandro and Pete.

Yea, the vibrato got to be a bit too much, just sometimes happens, thankfully not always.

The soprano is a Yani Elimona and the neck is off a Yani SC 900. It's bizarre how much it changes the sound. Makes playing a lot easier, especially for me as I've been having problems with tendonitis. Would love to hear what you can do with this strange set up as it's a very different feel to play this way and the sound is much darker. Has more of an English Horn quality to my ear.
 

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I guess it should be possible for Pete to equip a Bauhaus Walstein straight soprano (if not a one piece one) with a BW curved neck ( provided it is of the appropriate taper and length)
 

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I guess it should be possible for Pete to equip a Bauhaus Walstein straight soprano (if not a one piece one) with a BW curved neck ( provided it is of the appropriate taper and length)
I have a BW M2 with a straight and curved neck, but the curved neck is not a fully curved neck which I would prefer, ie the same curve as an alot. I don't want to change the sound though, I have been thinking about finding someone to adapt the existing straight neck to a fully curved.
 

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yes, but that's why I was suggesting that you ask Martin at BW if the curved neck of a curved soprano (more curved than the curved one on the straight soprano, I think) to try one of those on your straight soprano and see what happens.
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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yes, but that's why I was suggesting that you ask Martin at BW if the curved neck of a curved soprano (more curved than the curved one on the straight soprano, I think) to try one of those on your straight soprano and see what happens.
I don't think they do an M2 curved, only the Bronze and AI, neither of which have a fully curved neck. Oddly the picture on the Curly Woodwind site appears to be more curved than on the Woodwind and Bras Ltd site. I have seen very few curved. sopranos with a fully curved neck, they are mostly a shallow curve. I want a full curve.
 

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you are right but maybe the curved one (non M2) has a similar taper than the M2.......worth trying. I think the angle of the picture makes the curly woodwind look more curved but probably it isn't
 

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you are right but maybe the curved one (non M2) has a similar taper than the M2.......worth trying. I think the angle of the picture makes the curly woodwind look more curved but probably it isn't
Yes, I'll pop down to WWand Bras and try one out. But I still want one as curved as an alto, and i"m sure that one isn't.

Sorry wade, we've hijacked your thread.
 

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well, as far as curved sopranos go the BW is , together with the Yanagisawa , the most curved one on the market.
It is not a 90° curve though that's for sure.
 

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I have a BW M2 with a straight and curved neck, but the curved neck is not a fully curved neck which I would prefer, ie the same curve as an alot. I don't want to change the sound though, I have been thinking about finding someone to adapt the existing straight neck to a fully curved.
Pete, just a note. You mention that while you want a fully curved neck for your BW, you do not want to change the sound. I play a Yani SC902, having both the original less curved neck and also a fully curved Yani neck bought on the aftermarket. I've used both, preferring the fully curved neck for ergonomic reasons, but my own experience is that the fully curved neck while playing darker also is noticeably less free blowing (more resistant) than the original neck. So as might be expected, there are not insignificant trade offs in changing the neck geometry (implicit also in Wade's OP).

'museman'
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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my own experience is that the fully curved neck while playing darker also is noticeably less free blowing (more resistant) than the original neck. So as might be expected, there are not insignificant trade offs in changing the neck geometry (implicit also in Wade's OP).
That may well be true, or it might not happen. The semi curved neck doesn't seem to sound significantly different to the straight neck. I don't think I'll know until I try.

No doubt I may perceive more difference than there actually is, because of the different angle of the horn with a curved neck.
 

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I'm the opposite. I use the straight neck on all of my sops with dual necks. And, on my SC902, I often use a straight solid-silver Yanagisawa neck bought off of eBay years ago. The straight neck on the SC902 looks odd - many comments about it when I play it in public, but it gives me more "punch" than do any of the curved necks, including a solid-siler Yanagisawa curved neck. And, the straight neck on the curved soprano isn't any more ergonomically INcorrect than on any other soprano. DAVE
 

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And, the straight neck on the curved soprano isn't any more ergonomically INcorrect than on any other soprano. DAVE
For me they are worse, as I need to hold the instrument out from my body, it can get a bit tiring.
 

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This thread caused me to get out my S992 this morning and try some necks. Like I posted before, I have a curved solid-silver Yanagisawa neck that I bought at about the same time I bought the straight solid-silver Yana neck - both necks off of eBay.

So, after playing the S992's stock straight neck, I put on the solid-silver curved neck. I used a Super Session J mouthpiece (the brightness of the SS-J corrects for the mellowness of the bronze S992 - subtle but I hear it).

This is a neck with a more radical curve than the curved neck included with the S992. As I recall, Yanagisawa's curved sopranos come with a curved neck that is more radical than the straight sops' curved necks . . . at least that seems to be the case with my S992 and SC902. The after-market curved solid-silver neck has the same curvature as does the neck that came with my SC902, so I can only conclude that the solid-silver curved neck was intended for a curved Yanagisawa soprano.

The results were interesting - and good. The solid-silver neck has the same playing properties as do the straight necks - strong, vibrant, and good response - no typical curved-neck mellowness (or maybe "stuffiness" is a better term for what I get out of most curved necks on sopranos). I don't recall trying this combination before - and I was pleasantly surprised. The playing position puts the horn in more tightly to my body, giving more of an alto-like position. I'll try it at my next gig. DAVE
 

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Pete: After 55 years of playing sopranos, I've developed muscle memory for the things and without a strap, holding sopranos at most available angles doesn't bother me. DAVE
 

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Discussion Starter #18
No doubt that you're right Dave. The straight necks have max "punch". When my right arm tendon is up to it and I want that punch I use the straight neck as well, but this is about examining the "dark side", you know, full moon with clouds etc. The full curve neck with the straight sop gives a much darker sound than the full curve on the SC900. Maybe that's because it's pointed at the floor instead of in the air? I don't know, but it also records differently, so I don't think it's my imagination.

Not trying to start a fad, just that many seem to be looking for a very dark sop sound. I like variation depending on what's being played. Main reason for trying it was to make playing easier for the tendon problem.
 

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Might we have any consensus regarding which has the greater influence of affecting resistance and tone production: Neck vs mouthpiece?

Dave - Might you compare, say Morgan Vintage/medium curve to Selmer SS/fuller curve?
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Good point Dr G. I can't say that I noticed any difference in resistance using the same mouthpiece and a straight neck vs. full curve. Then again maybe I'm not that observant? But I certainly hear the tone difference! Go for the tone eh Doc.
 
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