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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good evening sax family,

Had a question that I wanted to seek some insight on.

My primary sax is tenor, but I'm looking to expand and get a 2nd soprano. I'm used to and have always played on a straight or 1 piece soprano, but in trying to branch out and do more in this upcoming year.

I'm looking at curved sopranos, but my question is this.....

Which, in your expert opinion, is the better option? A curved or straight one?

Like I mentioned earlier, I'm open to suggestions and opinions. Will a curved one be better or worse, as I have big hands?

Thanks in advance for your support in this.

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I like curved better, because to me it sounds more like a saxophone (which may be all in my head and not my ears), and it doesn't resemble what Kenny G plays, so I don't have people asking for his songs or expecting me to sound like that. On the flip side, if soprano is a double -- I've been coming across a lot of that lately in big bands -- it's a lot faster to switch to a straight than a curved.
 

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Personally, I like the curvies. My hands aren't huge. I like the fact that I can use a neck strap. I asked a pro who was using a curvy. He liked it because he could manage playing into a mic easier than the straight.
 

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There must be about 20 threads regarding this question on this forum, just use the Google Custom Search function and query "difference between curved and straight soprano". I have both and I like the straight one better but it is also a question of the particular instrument
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Personally, I like the curvies. My hands aren't huge. I like the fact that I can use a neck strap. I asked a pro who was using a curvy. He liked it because he could manage playing into a mic easier than the straight.
Ok cool. I have a saxophone mic, and will be upgrading to a wireless sax mic in a few months, so playing into a mic won't be an issue. I will stop into a few music stores this weekend and try some out. I usually just shop for tenors, and I'm looking at an alto now, but I appreciate your input!

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
There must be about 20 threads regarding this question on this forum, just use the Google Custom Search function and query "difference between curved and straight soprano". I have both and I like the straight one better but it is also a question of the particular instrument
Thanks. Checking that out now.

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And the correct answer is “Both/neither”.

For sale: One of the modern grail sops. Borgani Jubilee "half curved" soprano sax in gold pearl finish.

See it here at Borgani's website: http://borgani.com/en/saxophone/halfcurvedsopranosax-pearlgold

This particular sop has very low wear to the plating (the wear is on the palm key and pinky touches), and the finish is in excellent condition. I had it overhauled when I bought it to take care of the issues associated with factory Borgani setups. I also bought a new ProTec case for it that remains in top condition, or will ship it with a classic blue leather Borgani with shoulder strap.

I have played a lot of sops over the last 40+ years, and for me, this is/was the best. I am only selling because I found another that I like even more - a special edition Borgani half-curved (bent neck) - so I won’t be giving up on Borgani sops. These are wonderful.

Price: Asking $3200 (mouthpiece not included), including shipping within the U.S.





The horn is shipping from Northern California. I’ll consider a reduced price if buyer wants to try the horn in person and pick it up - talk to me.
See the thread at https://forum.saxontheweb.net/newreply.php?do=newreply&p=3807480
 

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I like a straight with two necks; straight neck I use for jazz and swing. The curved for shows or when I need to blend in a section.
 

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If you go curved, get a Yanagisawa....really great or for less money, vintage. Most of the oldies only go to high Eb except Conn and some Bueschers. A straight is easier to find but if you already have a soprano (assume you meant 2nd sop.) a curvie would be great.
 

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lots of threads over the yeas about this (they are all there in the archives which we keep exactly to be read and continued, please look these things up before )

I’ve chosen a selection of several dozens ( look up things here https://www.saxontheweb.net on the center box on to you have Google Custom Search , this is the only box on the site which gives you a good usable search engine!, please use it, dispersing information is in nobody’s interest)

Good Luck and enjoy!

https://www.saxontheweb.net/Learning/Soprano.html

https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showt...s-Straight-Soprano-Saxophones-and-Cheap-Deals

https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?16251-Curved-vs-straight-soprano

https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?2222-Curved-vs-Straight-Differences-in-sound

https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?34910-Straight-vs-Curved-Sopranos-Intonation!!!!
 

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I like the semi-curved or 'tipped-bell' sopranos but I think I would also like a premium straight soprano like a Yanagisawa but with the two necks. I would definitely use the curved neck because I like the mellower sound but still want that soprano distinctive ability to get angry! Also the curved neck makes the use of a strap practical.
 

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I like the curved ones for sound, but they are so tiny they look like a toy to the audience.

The straight ones look better but have more of an oboe-ish sound to them. Curved neck helps a bit.

So the answer is, "It depends"

Insights and incites by Notes
 

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BTW, I had a chance not long ago to try out a 103xxx MK VI soprano in excellent shape - I was going to sell it for a friend. With my Soprano Planet mouthpiece the VI was small-sounding but very clear and sweet. I guess if that's what you're after go for it. I wouldn't have traded my Chinese tipped-bell for it. Much 'bigger' sound and can get funky.
 

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I have tried several curved soprano over the years but the strap hits my neck in a way that stops me from breathing :0 thus I play straight sops.
 

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Comes to personal preference. Based on your location (I'm in the same general area), you can visit Chuck Levin's (Wheaton, MD) and L&L (Gaithersburg) and get plenty to try out. I've played and owned a few straight sopranos. I played my first curved soprano a little over a year ago and (based on my personal preference) was hooked for two main reasons: 1) the curve in the curved soprano gives you much much more of your sound in your face and ears....for me it was a mind-blowing experience. 2) Playing a straight soprano, my right wrist was always curved just a bit toward my body to land my fingers on the keys. That wrist angle was a bit of a strain over time and messed with my pinky (low C/low Eb keys) dexterity. The curved soprano is held closer to the body and hence I never had that wrist issue on the curved soprano.

Get into those stores and check them out. The "better option" is the one that sounds good and feels good to you....if it sounds good and feels good, you'll play more and that's what it's all about anyway.
 

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Sound depends more on manufacturer and design and mouthpiece and you. All cureved are not created equal etc.

That said, if you want to feel like a giant playing a miniature sax...curved! Hahahaha
 

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That's what I felt like when I was playing my friend's soprano.

I went to hear him on the gig, he said, "Did you bring your horn?" I replied "Nope" and he said "Play this one".

I felt like a giant at times, and at others like I was playing a toy.

I never really bonded with Soprano though. If I ever try it again, I might try one of those saxellos that King invented way back when and some people still make.

Insights and incites by Notes
 

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I've come to the conclusion that a single body soprano is best. I own 4 sopranos (why???) - an old Martin, a cheap Venus tipped bell with two necks, a Yanagisawa curved and a one-piece bent neck Viking. I like the Yani, and I actually like the el-cheapo Venus too, but I am acutely aware of the fragile nature of the tenon and socket on these tiny necks. If I try a new mouthpiece or have to push on the mouthpiece really far (most true for the Yani), it's difficult to do so without thinking I might break the octave key, or if the neck is on the horn, bend the tenon and/or socket. With a single body horn, it's much easier to find a safe place to get a strong grip to put the mouthpiece on, or take it off. And there is a certain solidity to the sound.

I prefer the bent neck approach, and I wish more manufacturers would do this. Currently only Yamaha does, and I don't really like the sound I make on Yamaha sopranos.
 

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I prefer the bent neck approach, and I wish more manufacturers would do this. Currently only Yamaha does, and I don't really like the sound I make on Yamaha sopranos.
Steve, just to torture you, Yanagisawa made a bronze, S902R, with a one-piece bent neck a few years ago that was sold only in Japan as far as I can tell. They occasionally come up for sale. It would give you an alternative if you are willing to search patiently and pay the price.
 
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