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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

I can't find any info on him. Did he made the mouthpieces for Martin in early days? Did he work together with Arnold Brilhart?
Was he member/part of "The Committee" at the Martin factories in '30-'40's that developed the MartinCommittee?
Any info appreciated!
TIA,

Paul
 

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Steve Broadus was part of the Martin Committee. I don't know that he ever worked with Brilhart or on Martin mpcs, but anything is possible.

Near as I can figure out from back issues of Metronome magazine, he was in business by 1933 at 1595 Broadway, NYC, making and selling reeds and mouthpieces. The mpc he made at first was the "diamond SB" model, a conventional open chamber design. By 1935 he had introduced the "Perfected Model," with the two textured rings on the shank.

I see him advertising in Metronome through 1937. I don't see him there in 1938, but I only have 2 issues from that year.
 

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If memory serves, some of the other Martin Committee members were Joe Gillespie (former big band sideman who did work at the Martin factory), Joe Usifer (NBC staff reedman), and Norm Bates (NYC area sax teacher).
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Paul,

Thanks a lot!
I did have a Perfected model for tenor; do you know till when these were made after 1935....what I mean is that that piece looked so good (and new) that I thought i could not be that old from the 30's.

greetings,
paul
 

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paullanfermeijer said:
Paul,

Thanks a lot!
I did have a Perfected model for tenor; do you know till when these were made after 1935....what I mean is that that piece looked so good (and new) that I thought i could not be that old from the 30's.
There are enough of these around that they must have been made into the 1940s as well. Beyond that I have no idea.
 

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These are great mouthpieces particularly with some modification. I have a perfected alto and a friend has a perfected tenor, both done by Doc Tenney and they are wonderful. My alto piece has a big dark sound with enough resistance and very smooth response.

Here is some info from the fibercell website:
Probably the first two people to make plastic reeds were Steve Broadus and Arnold Brilhart. If my information is correct, Steve was clarinetist with the Radio City Music Hall Orchestra at the age of 15 and later, in the 40’s, made mouthpieces for Benny Goodman and others. During the second World War, he made plastic reeds from styrene when the French cane was needed to hide soldiers.

Arnold Brilhart started his performance career in 1922, with all the great musical groups; the Dorsey’s, Benny Goodman, Louis Armstrong and others. In 1939, he began making mouthpieces such as the white "Tonalin" and plastic "Enduro" reeds. He subsequently worked for Rico in the later years of his life in a creative role until he passed away May 17, 1998, at 93 years of age.

In the 60’s, Steve Broadus worked with Arnold Brilhart, in Carlsbad, California, developing Fibercane, the first composite reed material. To my benefit, in his later years, Steve was my lunch buddy, confidant, mentor and chief motivator until he passed away in the early 1980’s.
 

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Hi all,

I can't find any info on him. Did he made the mouthpieces for Martin in early days? Did he work together with Arnold Brilhart?
Was he member/part of "The Committee" at the Martin factories in '30-'40's that developed the MartinCommittee?
Any info appreciated!
TIA,

Paul
The "mouthpiece museum" has a page on Broadus mouthpieces, that states, of the S3 mouthpieces: "These Steve Broadus mouthpieces were specifically designed to go with the high-end Martin saxophones, such as the Magma." Notice in the pictures, it says right on the mouthpiece "Designed by Steve Broadus for Martin".

http://www.mouthpiecemuseum.com/MouthpieceMuseum/Broadus.html
 

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Don't know much about the man but my Steve Broadus perfected mpcs on both alto and tenor are both excellent vintage pieces. They seem kinda' like a short shank version of an Otto Link Slant Sig or Res-o-chamber.
 

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...ive had to be picky to wittle down my large collection of tenor mouthpieces...but the broadus has a special something that i wont let go...its a wierd blow for me,i think working better in softer connotations....i also had to fill in the throaght as it was HUGE,and really didnt fit the neck
 

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Does anyone know why the 'Mouthpiece museum' of TheoWanne removed many pages on the vintage mouthpieces including the Steve Broadus line?
I remember the museum was much broader in contents and now they only left the "major brands" online?

The "mouthpiece museum" has a page on Broadus mouthpieces, that states, of the S3 mouthpieces: "These Steve Broadus mouthpieces were specifically designed to go with the high-end Martin saxophones, such as the Magma." Notice in the pictures, it says right on the mouthpiece "Designed by Steve Broadus for Martin".

http://www.mouthpiecemuseum.com/MouthpieceMuseum/Broadus.html
 

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I am looking for more into on my Broadus mpc. It says on it "designed by STEVE BROADUS for MARTIN Elkhart Ind. USA" in a shield on the top and has a ++ on the bottom.
The page on the mouthpiece museum is gone unfortunately. The rest of the site is really great. Thanks Theo! I was able to read up on a couple other old pieces in my harem.
This is an awesome mpc on my Martin Indiana also. Smooth and dark. It has a round chamber, I don't know what the tip size is.
It wasn't very expensive for something old and precious. I love it.
 

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Does anyone know why the 'Mouthpiece museum' of TheoWanne removed many pages on the vintage mouthpieces including the Steve Broadus line?
I remember the museum was much broader in contents and now they only left the "major brands" online?
maybe the lesser known brands were too much competition for the hot collectibles...

archive.org might have earlier incarnations of those pages, btw.
 
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