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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone, I just bought a Yani 880 alto recently. I took it to the repair guy at SamAsh Music and he realigned some keys and "balanced" the tension of the keys for softer playing. The horn plays great but just about every other time I play "D" (right hand) with or without the octave key, it makes this squealing sound and it's aggravating since I have to keep playing the note until it plays right. I can play any note no problem but when I get to D it may or may not play right. I've tried a Yamaha 4C, Selmer S90, and the Yani 4 mouth pieces with 2 1/2 Rico Royals and 3 Vandoren reeds and the sax behaves the same with all of them. I have a Yamaha YAS-23 and I'm able to play the D on it just fine every time. So I don't see what I could be doing wrong with the Yani other than maybe the D key is leaking or something.
Does anyone have any suggestions? I’d hate to pay the repair guy and have him tell me there’s nothing wrong. :(
 

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That's what it's supposed to do.

Hehe...well...actually, you certainly shouldn't have to pay a tech a dime for them to look at it. Does SamAsh make you do that ????

Sounds like a leak...doesn't necessarily mean it's the D pad either, but something's leaking somewhere, methinks. the other possibility was the reed/m'piece situation, but you covered that already, so it's probably the horn.....
 

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First check your neck octave adjustment. Finger G and then press the octave key hard several times while watching the neck octave key. It should not move or bounce. If it does, take the neck off, put your thumb between the ring and the bottom of the neck and with the other hand carefully bend the neck octave key down just a little bit. Then do the test again. If you have bent too far and the neck octave key doesn't open, push the ring the other way to bend it back slightly.

If this is not the problem, then it is probably pilot error. Play the mouthpiece and neck off the sax and see what pitch it produces. Check with a tuner and adjust your embouchure and throat to produce the note Ab concert. Then play the D again with that embouchure keeping the back of the tongue low like saying "AHH". On some saxes the D will easily jump to the higher overtone A if the back of the tongue is too high. You might also try thinking of blowing your airstream down toward your thumb on the octave key pad. Also make sure you are not moving your jaw while tonguing. That can cause strange sounds to come out at random as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That's what it's supposed to do.

Hehe...well...actually, you certainly shouldn't have to pay a tech a dime for them to look at it. Does SamAsh make you do that ????

Sounds like a leak...doesn't necessarily mean it's the D pad either, but something's leaking somewhere, methinks. the other possibility was the reed/m'piece situation, but you covered that already, so it's probably the horn.....
That is what I thought. I'm not sure but I assume the will at least charge some sort of bench fee I assume. The interesting thing is that the tech did use a light to check for leaks which then he realigned some keys. It's possible he missed one.
Thanks for the quick reply, I'll take to him in the morning and see what the damage is :)

I'm glad is not something I'm doing wrong, I'm a newbie but I don't think I'd suck that bad :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
First check your neck octave adjustment. Finger G and then press the octave key hard several times while watching the neck octave key. It should not move or bounce. If it does, take the neck off, put your thumb between the ring and the bottom of the neck and with the other hand carefully bend the neck octave key down just a little bit. Then do the test again. If you have bent too far and the neck octave key doesn't open, push the ring the other way to bend it back slightly.

If this is not the problem, then it is probably pilot error. Play the mouthpiece and neck off the sax and see what pitch it produces. Check with a tuner and adjust your embouchure and throat to produce the note Ab concert. Then play the D again with that embouchure keeping the back of the tongue low like saying "AHH". On some saxes the D will easily jump to the higher overtone A if the back of the tongue is too high. You might also try thinking of blowing your airstream down toward your thumb on the octave key pad. Also make sure you are not moving your jaw while tonguing. That can cause strange sounds to come out at random as well.
Actually, I did check that already. When I don't press G the octave key works fine and when I do press G, the octave does not move, however the rod which activates the octave key does move a little but not enough to touch the octave key. The rod does have a little bit play from the moment you push the key to the moment it it touches the octave key to move it. Is that normal? I don't recall my YAS-23 doing that.

I did noticed when I blow for D you can hear a minor squeal just before the note specialyy when I blow slow on it I can notice it the most.

Thanks for reply.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
If this is not the problem, then it is probably pilot error. Play the mouthpiece and neck off the sax and see what pitch it produces. Check with a tuner and adjust your embouchure and throat to produce the note Ab concert. Then play the D again with that embouchure keeping the back of the tongue low like saying "AHH". On some saxes the D will easily jump to the higher overtone A if the back of the tongue is too high. You might also try thinking of blowing your airstream down toward your thumb on the octave key pad. Also make sure you are not moving your jaw while tonguing. That can cause strange sounds to come out at random as well.[/QUOTE]

Thanks for the sugestion. I will try this in the morning. Everyone is sleeping now :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If this is not the problem, then it is probably pilot error. Play the mouthpiece and neck off the sax and see what pitch it produces. Check with a tuner and adjust your embouchure and throat to produce the note Ab concert. Then play the D again with that embouchure keeping the back of the tongue low like saying "AHH". On some saxes the D will easily jump to the higher overtone A if the back of the tongue is too high. You might also try thinking of blowing your airstream down toward your thumb on the octave key pad. Also make sure you are not moving your jaw while tonguing. That can cause strange sounds to come out at random as well.[/QUOTE]

jbtsax you are genius! It does play an higher octave A and the repair guy took a look at and confirmed the horn is fine. I feel like a baphoon after finding out the it was me all along. It actually helped to support to weight of the horn more one my thumb than the neck strap and the problem is gone. The only problem is building my thumb strength since I'm flexi jointed and my fingers are weaker than the average. This horn is heavy compared to my Yamaha YAS-23 :).

Thanks a bunch!
 

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jbtsax you are genius! It does play an higher octave A and the repair guy took a look at and confirmed the horn is fine. I feel like a baphoon after finding out the it was me all along. It actually helped to support to weight of the horn more one my thumb than the neck strap and the problem is gone. The only problem is building my thumb strength since I'm flexi jointed and my fingers are weaker than the average. This horn is heavy compared to my Yamaha YAS-23 :).

Thanks a bunch!
Definitely not a genius. I just taught a bazillion kids to play the saxophone over 32 years and had to deal with every problem imaginable. The solution is not to support the weight of the sax with your thumb. It is important to set the neck strap to the correct length in order to have the mouthpiece at the right angle. This will make a big difference.

1. Sit upright in the chair, back straight, head level.
2. Let the neckstrap hold the entire weight of the sax
3. Balance the sax with your two thumbs
4. Push the bell of the sax forward toward the knee
5. See where the tip of the mouthpiece touches
6. It should touch the curve right above your chin
7. If it is too high or too low adjust the neck strap length
8. When it is correct, tilt the head down slightly and put the mouthpiece in the mouth
9. The mouthpiece should be going straight into the mouth.

Practice some long tones on your D shaping your throat as if singing "AHH" and imagining you are blowing your airstream toward the thumb on the octave key. When that is under control play high A and slur down to D and then back to A. When this is stable, try to play A while fingering D on purpose by blowing the air higher and shaping your tongue as if saying "EE". When you have learned to control which note comes out when you finger D, then you will never have that problem again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Definitely not a genius. I just taught a bazillion kids to play the saxophone over 32 years and had to deal with every problem imaginable. The solution is not to support the weight of the sax with your thumb. It is important to set the neck strap to the correct length in order to have the mouthpiece at the right angle. This will make a big difference.

1. Sit upright in the chair, back straight, head level.
2. Let the neckstrap hold the entire weight of the sax
3. Balance the sax with your two thumbs
4. Push the bell of the sax forward toward the knee
5. See where the tip of the mouthpiece touches
6. It should touch the curve right above your chin
7. If it is too high or too low adjust the neck strap length
8. When it is correct, tilt the head down slightly and put the mouthpiece in the mouth
9. The mouthpiece should be going straight into the mouth.

Practice some long tones on your D shaping your throat as if singing "AHH" and imagining you are blowing your airstream toward the thumb on the octave key. When that is under control play high A and slur down to D and then back to A. When this is stable, try to play A while fingering D on purpose by blowing the air higher and shaping your tongue as if saying "EE". When you have learned to control which note comes out when you finger D, then you will never have that problem again.
I appreciate your advise. I will give it a try today, also I finally got a hold of a local teacher and will start taking some lessons again next week :). It's long overdue, I feel like I'm stuck in the mud and I can't get out :).

Thanks again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
That's what it's supposed to do.

Hehe...well...actually, you certainly shouldn't have to pay a tech a dime for them to look at it. Does SamAsh make you do that ????

Sounds like a leak...doesn't necessarily mean it's the D pad either, but something's leaking somewhere, methinks. the other possibility was the reed/m'piece situation, but you covered that already, so it's probably the horn.....
Well, it looks like you were right after all. My instructor played my horn and referred me to his repair guy. I took it to him and when he put the light in the horn, he showed me all the places it was leaking from High D, right hand C, Eb, and Bb. I just got it back today and I tell you what, This Yani 880 sounds awesome, the sound has some balls now :mrgreen: . Wow what a difference, now I can concentrate on playing without worries.
SamAsh charged to the tune of $95 and did not fix my horn. I even took it back to then and the tech looked at it again and flat out told me there was nothing wrong with the horn. He either was lazy or did not know what he was doing. But I'm glad I found a good tech who is also $20 per hour cheaper than SamAsh in my neighborhood.

I appreciate all of you who tried to help me out with this.
 

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I was going to suggest you take it to a real "Tech". But you already did. I had nothing but problems with Sam Ash. One store charged me $35 to replace the cork on the neck. Didn't realize he didn't change it 'till I got home. Never got my money back. Unless you're in Raleigh, N.C. where Matt's at, I would stay away from Sam Ash.
 
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