Sax on the Web Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello! This is a pressing issue since I'm in a school band and need to figure it out pronto!

I started playing saxophone a little over a year ago and have been pretty good at it. My embouchure still needs work but it's decent, and I rarely squeak on notes.

But recently, I started playing a new exercise with a simple middle B to middle D slur, just quarter notes, nothing hard at all, and somehow the D seems to change entirely. It gets far higher (like a squeak) than the note written.

It isn't a fingering issue, since I can play the note perfectly when I'm not slurring, and I'm playing it the same as I do any other slur, which all seem to end up sounding fine, all except this one.
Is there something I can fix about my technique or should I take it to the shop?


Maia7
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,523 Posts
My first guess is the octave key on the neck is popping open for an instant when you finger the D. Test this just by fingering the note and watching the key. When in correct adjustment, it should not do this. It takes some expertise or mechanical ability to fix.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Technician
Joined
·
21,285 Posts
What he said.....
Also it may be a problem with the reed not exactly even on the mouthpiece thus hanging over a rail, ligature not firm or a warped mouthpiece. Try a different mouthpiece but I suspect the octave keys. Only the body octave vent should open on D2 and not the neck one.
 

·
Moderator
Grafton + TH & C alto || Naked Lady 10M || TT soprano || Martin Comm III
Joined
·
30,102 Posts
I agree wit the possibility/probability of it being an issue with octave mechanism or key.

However it could also be that you are not quite synchronising left and right hands as you switch from B to D. You can try to consciously close the left hand momentarily before the right. If it is happening the other way round (right before left) you get the squeak. Ideally they close at the exact same moment, but if not then it's better for left to be before right.

If it is purely due to octave mechanism, then this will also be a workaround to stop the squeak until you get the horn fixed.
 

·
Registered
Alto sax, Tenor sax, Clarinet
Joined
·
1,359 Posts
I recommend that you check some basics. First make sure that the reed tip goes all the way up to the mouthpiece tip when you press the reed to the tip. If the reed is low, you can get surprise squeaks. But also make sure that when you slur from the almost open B to the D that you are not unconsciously pinching the reed shut as you are jumping into the higher register. Also do not get real aggressive with the attack. These are common errors that can cause a myriad of problems.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,745 Posts
My guess is that your fingers are not all perfectly synchronized. Even we old farts sometimes have to deal with this, for example my new bass saxophone has the palm keys in a different place than I'm used to and I haven't yet eliminated all the bobbles. (I have been playing saxophone for almost 40 years.)

The immediate cure is to very slowly go between the notes paying very strict attention to the synchronization of your fingers till you have it solid and reliable at a speed much slower than you will be playing it, then you can gradually work the speed up.

The long term cure is to commit yourself to regular intervals practice so you can develop the ability to go from any note to any other note without finger bobbles or tonal burps, and matching tonal quality across each interval. I have posted a specific exercise my flute teacher gave me 45 years ago that I still practice and that is extremely useful. If you check on my userid you should be able to find these posts.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top