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Discussion Starter #1
So once in a while, but much more of late, i am getting a spitty/bubbly kind of like static (no other way to describe it) sound as I am playing.
Not sure how it comes or how it goes away...
I am assuming it is an embouchure issue, but not really sure.
Not an old reed / new reed issue.
Any thoughts?
 

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Sudden change in humidity. Excess saliva. Reed not being properly placed on the mouthpiece.

This can happen for a number of reasons. I find if I also get myself really out of breath and then try and play softly it will sometimes happen.
 

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If it's on the baritone, you need to remove the accumulated water in the curve, by opening the water valve.
Especially in the summer, a lot of water condenses there.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Not on Bari, BUT...humidity just cranked up this week here in NY!
And last night I was trying to get in a longer practice by playing softly as the kids went to bed.

So, what can be done about it?
 

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This happened to me also. One day it just started and I tried to find out what it was that was causing this. I was putting on wet reeds. I started wiping water off the reed and it stopped. Something else may have been the cause, I don't know, but that irritating sound stopped. And hasn't returned.
 

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Hmmmm.............kids went to bed...........trying to play softly. If so, the spit often doesn't make it far enough to clear the upper part of the baffle perhaps. It's normal, in fact I've heard it on recordings by some of the old masters.
 

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The water is on the reed. Just blow into the mouthpiece without touching it and it will temporarily clear it. Make sure when playing that the mouthpiece is tilted down at the rear so water drains into the neck. Interestingly, the manner in which you are playing can cause a watery mouthpiece to be a problem, and playing softly is the main cause. Also it bothers players who tend to play in a sub-tone all the time, like Stan Getz did. I have heard on some of his records a little spit crackling followed by the sound of him blowing air into the mouthpiece. Its a subtle thing but it was there a few times. In a studio, you have to be careful blowing air at the mouthpiece because it is possible with a soft reed to make it squawk that way. :)
 

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As a "wet player" all my life because I begin to salivate when the mouthpiece is put in the mouth, I have learned a couple of tricks. When water accumulates on the back of the reed I inhale sharply and draw the moisture back where it came from. I also "polish" the backs of my cane reeds by rubbing them with the grain on a piece of stiff paper like the inside cover of a method book until they start to make a clicking sound. When the back of the reed is smooth and shiny the moisture forms small droplets and rolls of the reed instead of remaining there and causing a sizzling sound. These methods along with stopping occasionally during a playing session and running a swab through the neck and mouthpiece with the reed removed work to make the problem manageable for me.
 
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