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Very nice, I particularly like when she hit a wrong note :) , maybe an an adult , if she is going to meet jazz on her path she would use that to build upon.
 

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I have been often wondering about whether I am affected by any particular condition which has given me a more than well developed capability to 鈥 feel鈥 music, so that I have better than average improvisational skills (albeit melodic ones).

As I said in another thread, it has been postulated by several teachers that I ahve have some blockage which makes me read music in a very primitive way while I have always possessed bettern than average ear (although not exactly exceptional).

I never realized that until I went to play in this group which required no musical experience to improvise. There I was doing better than most readers and non readers alike.

A similar talent has allowed me to be fluent in at least 3 languages and have a decent skills of few more.

This was the thing which lead me to communicate with Dr. Deutsch . Parallelisms among music and language skills. Sounds, pitch, rhythm, and structure are common to both language and music.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Sounds, pitch ...
Melodic intonation . The theory of Intonation arose in Russia at the beginning of 20th century in the works of B. Yavorsky, and wasn't widespread in the West; probably because the author did not leave to the West after the revolution .However, with its help, I save hundreds of words and reduce the initial work with the student on improvisation several times. I already have experience in the class when the process from zero to simple meaningful improvisation took 25 minutes.
 

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Yes, I also saw these materials. My main interest: methods that pave the way for the synthesis of spoken and musical language in order to educate a intentionally improvising musician who has every note that makes sense.
This is very interesting. The article says that during conversations, humans regularly decode not only what is said but also WHY- a very sophisticated (dare I say divine) process. What is sometimes missed in the study of improvisation, from the perspective of endless books analyzing theory, is the very purpose of music. The purpose of all art is to convey human emotion. No matter the art form- visual, dance , music- the artist strives to gain skill. But sometimes we get caught up in the skill, gear, etc. and lose site of the end goal- to make art. (Case in point- endless MP discussions vs. talking about the actual music).

Some individuals don't have the ability to convey emotion by way of speech (i.e. on the autistic spectrum, traumatic brain injury, dementia). Some of these individuals "code" their feelings (the "whys") in the language of music, even if not verbal language. Studying these individuals might shed some light on this synthesis. Although it might sound spooky or something, the metaphysical aspect might be the actual answer, and the trick would be to study that (soul/spirit) and how it manifests in the physical world in the form of art.
 

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I think that indeed any particular 鈥 pathology鈥 which manifest itself associated to any particular 鈥 gift鈥 may give an insight on the mechanisms used by the brain to do anything.

Special or common abilities, exist , however, also in absence of a pathology and are just features of the brain.

In essence, I think, this was what Professor Oliver Saks sought to show in Musicophilia

"( Oliver Saks)... examines the powers of music through the individual experiences of patients, musicians, and everyday people鈥揻rom a man who is struck by lightning and suddenly inspired to become a pianist at the age of forty-two, to an entire group of children with Williams syndrome who are hypermusical from birth; from people with 鈥渁musia,鈥 to whom a symphony sounds like the clattering of pots and pans, to a man whose memory spans only seven seconds鈥揻or everything but music.

Our exquisite sensitivity to music can sometimes go wrong: Sacks explores how catchy tunes can subject us to hours of mental replay, and how a surprising number of people acquire nonstop musical hallucinations that assault them night and day. Yet far more frequently, music goes right: Sacks describes how music can animate people with Parkinson鈥檚 disease who cannot otherwise move, give words to stroke patients who cannot otherwise speak, and calm and organize people whose memories are ravaged by Alzheimer鈥檚 or amnesia...."
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
This is very interesting. The article says that during conversations, humans regularly decode not only what is said but also WHY- a very sophisticated (dare I say divine) process. What is sometimes missed in the study of improvisation, from the perspective of endless books analyzing theory, is the very purpose of music.
What I write about: "intentional", intentional phrases, "communication with intention". Spontaneous improvisation exposes our intentions, and the quality of music and harmony plays no role at this stage , just quality of intention . And here the most terrible enemy is EGO!
 

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milandro- yes, and it reminds us that individuals who aren't the norm might be the very ones to gain the information to learn priceless knowledge about, or even save, humanity. So we shouldn't discount them as culture often does.

jazzman- ego certainly is a culprit. But the more skill the artist has, the better the person can spontaneously play with intention, and really say something. Just like speech, a person who has a sound that truly expressed their voice as well as a rich vocabulary will more accurately convey their intentions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
jazzman- ego certainly is a culprit. But the more skill the artist has, the better the person can spontaneously play with intention, and really say something. Just like speech, a person who has a sound that truly expressed their voice as well as a rich vocabulary will more accurately convey their intentions.
Of course, just at first the baby cries with intent, and the stock of words comes later ...
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Well, not Russian improvisation, but I was for a couple of years the photographer of a theatrical group and I was exposed to their shows and workshops which were based on the teachings of Eugenio Barba ( you may be familiar with the odin teatret )
During 18 years I worked periodically as an orchestral pianist in the main theaters of Israel; in addition, I participated in the pilot of the Israeli version of TV show Whose Line Is It Anyway, but this didn't advance me one centimeter in understanding theatrical improvisation. Later I had to find and study specific materials on this topic.

However, I suppose we have different idea about improvisation, and that's good.
Therefore, it is useful to exchange ideas without downplaying the ideas of another. The Internet is open to all, and the desire to experiment, instead of chewed recipes. may lead to new discoveries.

I don't know what to think of the improvisations which you propose. They don't strike me as of a great improvised content (although they may have been played " In the moment"), they seem rather predictable progressions....
See how this gifted person starts with 4 notes and then " reduces" them to a pattern she knows and has digested. That too is improvisation but not of the unpredictable nature as walking on a lack rope.
The extraordinarily gifted persons in this case do not interest me at all. I am aiming at the most average students, and even lower than that. I had Tamir H械ndelman, Ruslan Sirota, Miku Narunsky, Mordy Ferber,Eden Giat , but this does not change my attitude towards each other student with his personality. Therefore (unlike others) I proudly expose students- aspiring improvisers, and would like to hear the same from others .
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Intonation is the most obvious and at the same time difficult to explain concept in music. It is almost impossible to fix intonation in contrast to melody, rhythm, harmonic chords, polyphonic combinations. You can only strive for its more accurate musical notation, and all the same, only a sensitive and talented performer will convey this intonation correctly, and each will do it his own way. The master can make a mistake, take the wrong note and still convey the intonational meaning of performed work .

This is the kind of information that every self-respecting musician must add to his own musical baggage.
 
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