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My 1971 Mark VI (alto) has got little green speckles on its neck. I do not play my alto very much so it sits alot firmenting the little green specks.

The neck of VI has got little chips in the finish (which i created 30 some years ago with the "chain neck strap" that came with horn) which now over time have turned green.

I thought of getting the neck re-done, but the people I talked to said I should not, as it would de-value the originality of the horn, plus matching the dark (almost orange) color of the finish would be difficult. Is there something I can use to clean the neck, and get rid of the green, without hurting what finish IS left on the neck? :cool:
 

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I don't know if I would be using brasso on a sax. That strikes me as a very bad idea.
 

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Swingin' Cat said:
Yep, brasso, Q-tips and some patience. Try only polishing the spots because with longer and harder polishing over the lacquer there is a chance of polishing some off.
 

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Do NOT use Brasso on your saxophone. It is far too abrasive to be used on an instrument that you actually care about....
 

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Using brasso to me sounds just like rolling your sax in sand then rubbing the sand into the horn so to cause maximum damage. But hey, if you get a kick out of that have fun. :shock:
 

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Brasso will actually do LESS damage than the little green specs !

There is nothing wrong with using Brasso on a saxophone, providing you don't go at it too hard. I would imagine these little specs are just holes in the lacquer ? If so, use Brasso, wipe off, then rub some polish over the top. OR, get some car wax to form a seal. No harm done whatsoever.

If you were doing it every other week, it'd be a problem, but you won't be, so go for it.
 

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I agree - Brasso.
1. As a brass polish it is actually on the rather gentle side. (For silver it is on the very aggressive side)
2. Yes, then green CAN harbour contaminants that will do a lot more damage than Brasso will.
3. Brasso may remove some of the lacquer where it is thinnest or insecure, and about to come off anyway.
4. Don't allow ANY traces of Brasso to remain in or around the pivots of keys.
5. Depending on the thickness of the green stuff, and how hard it is, Brasso may be very slow to remove it. If you find this to be the case, it may well be better to use something more locally aggressive first, such as a fine-grit "Cratex" (grit impregnated rubber) wheel first.
6. Where you use Brasso will finish up shiny-bright, which may not match the rest of the horn well until it tarnishes again.

Re "How did this happen?".... Loss of lacquer alone probably did not cause this. the surface has also been subject to something corrosive, such as your sweat, or a polluted or rather damp atmosphere. You don't spit over the neck by any chance? At least some of my customers do. :)
 

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Russ said:
....OR, get some car wax to form a seal. No harm done whatsoever....
Not the car wax - these usually (always?) contain silicones and if you (or any subsequent owner) tries to re-finish - your name will be mud.

Google "silicone fish-eye"
 

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DougR said:
Not the car wax - these usually (always?) contain silicones and if you (or any subsequent owner) tries to re-finish - your name will be mud.

Google "silicone fish-eye"
Who gives a stuff about subsequent owners ?? :D :D

If they wanted to refinish a crook that was speckled, then the best method would be to chemically strip it, therefore removing all the lacquer AND any polish over the top. If they wanted to take short cuts, or tinker with things without knowing the consequences, they should leave well alone ;)

Using car wax would be the same as using household polish as they also contain silicone, but the car wax stays on for longer, therefore the green specs would take much longer to return. I would imagine well over half players will have used Pledge on their horns...
 

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How did this happen?

Well, let me tell ya. At the time (35 years ago), I was in High School, and wrapping the neck of my VI to protect it was not high on my list of things to do after band practice was over. I used then, and still have now, the OEM neck strap that was made of chain. Day after day of cramming the neck in the compartment with the neck strap took its toll. As I said, that was 35 years ago. The horn was not used much after that time, until I jointed a band that could use a sax. I believe the green speckles are corrosion spots where the lacquer was chipped off over the years. They are small nicks, but there are a LOT of them!!! I would say there is more lacquer than nicks, but not by much. Also, keep in mind we are talk about the neck only, the rest of the horn is 95 percent original lacquer, and it is BEAUTIFUL!!!!!! I want to clean the green, and protect the neck (without silicone) for my demon progeny to enjoy someday....... :twisted: I don't (and never have) spit on, over, or around the neck. The horn has always been in its original case (which still smells like cork grease) and has been stored in a closet somewhere. I am pretty "anal" when it comes to my horns, so, I dunno how the green got there in the first place....
 

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Tommy, if you want to avoid silicone, then get a rub on paint sealant. It'll stop the green coming back after you've cleaned it up with Brasso.
 

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Othello3 said:
Using brasso to me sounds just like rolling your sax in sand then rubbing the sand into the horn so to cause maximum damage. But hey, if you get a kick out of that have fun. :shock:
What the heck are you talking about? Have you ever actually used Brasso on anything? It's not abrasive. That's why we used it in the military to shine the brass on our dress uniforms.

Grumpie's advise is good, though. Apply it only to the bare spots.
 

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Swingin' Cat said:
What the heck are you talking about? Have you ever actually used Brasso on anything? It's not abrasive. That's why we used it in the military to shine the brass on our dress uniforms.

Grumpie's advise is good, though. Apply it only to the bare spots.
Yes Brasso has a high abrasive content. A safer direction would be to use less abrasive products like the all-metal-polishes offered by Hagerty and Flitz.
 

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Pretty well everything is "abrasive'. It's a matter of degree.
Brasso may be abrasive overkill to polish a piece of polished brass, but for some decent tarnish, it is pretty darn good and has stood the test of a very long time.
 

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I agree with Gordon. Brasso is fine on saxophones and very good for tarnish on brass. For example, it's nothing ccompared with the buffing done at the factory (or other places). Plus, the amount of pressure you apply varies depending on situation. We tried Brasso on a sax of a friend of mine, probably the most tarnished I've ever seen, and without applying some force it actually removed nothing.
 

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Gordon (NZ) said:
Pretty well everything is "abrasive'. It's a matter of degree.
Brasso may be abrasive overkill to polish a piece of polished brass, but for some decent tarnish, it is pretty darn good and has stood the test of a very long time.
Well, yes, of course you're right: it contains silica crystals suspended in ammonia and petroleum distillates. I was over-reacting to the "roll your sax in sand" comment. And yes, Flitz is a fine product, as well. I have used both on various things, from firearms to paintball markers to saxophones, with excellent results.
 

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Let's say I use brasso and/or car wax on the sax body and later I need to solder something to it. What would be best way to prepare the spot on the body so the solder will stick? Thanks.
 
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