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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all.
I have been interested for quite some time in teaching myself to repair and service Saxes and recently bought a an old Silver Plated Kohlert VKS Tenor Sax which seemed to be an ideal choice to learn on as my local repairer said it would cost about twice as much to overhaul as it would be worth once done.
Whilst I am interested in any and all advice those experienced in repairs can offer, my most pressing need is to source replacement Flat Springs.

My horn doesn't have the same Flat Springs as most others out there. They are secured by TWO tiny screws instead of the single larger one most have.

Does anyone know where I can source the correct springs or will I need to fabricate them?

Before anyone suggests MusicMedic, I have already been in touch with them and they don't have them. They don't even have any without holes that I can drill myself. All my Google searching keeps drawing a blank.

Further, although I doubt it's possible, it seems like the horn has it's original pads! As far as I have been able to ascertain, it's circa 1935. Could pads possibly last that long? The upper body ones were all disintegrating, but many of the lower ones were still in reasonably good condition! They too are very different to the usual ones out there as they have NO Resonators and NO holes or studs in the centres. Also, they have an internal metal ring which surrounded the felt and pushed the leather out over the lip of the cup. Again, MusicMedic doesn't carry anything like this and suggested replacing them with standard flat metal resonator ones. I would love to hear everyone's opinions on this.
Thanking you all in advance.
Cheers from Australia.
Tony
 

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Ferree's and Dawkes sell a flat spring hole puncher, it will be an expensive thing to buy to punch a few holes

108375


at the same time there are double holed (but is the distance what you look for?) on Aliexpress


108374

having said this, there are more and more people buying cheap saxophones on line only to discover that they were cheap for a reason. Some (even amongst our most recent membership) have made a sport out of spotting the cheap saxophone out there.

We have to live with the hard reality, labor is the most expensive commodity when it comes to maintain old things. In my part of the world this has made repairing things very very difficult.

Many take to repairing saxophones and some may certainly achieve that goal but it take a lot of dedication

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks heaps milandro, I have no idea if the distance is right, but at that price I'll get some and take the chance!

Yeah, people are snapping up the cheap saxes in my area too. You have to be quick. I got lucky with the Kohlert though as it came with a mouthpiece worth more than I paid for the lot (a Henri Selmer Airflow), so the sax owes me nothing.

At the end of the day, repairing saxes is something I think I can be good at, but being a complete newbie, I'll need a lot of help and advice along the way.

Tony.
 

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I just saw some two hole springs online within the last couple of days, but do not remember where.
They are out there!
 

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Well again, prefabbed ones are of little use if the hole spacing isn't dead on, eh ?

Honestly....what I would do here is just ask a tech to drill a second hole. Give them the measurements and general weight of the spring (or simply tell them which key it is for) as well as the length....
 

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1/4" cordless drill motor and a set of teeny twist drills from MSC Supply or McMaster-Carr; a small vise and soft jaws for same. Second holes - done!
 

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Back when I was an apprentice I tried drilling a new hole in a flat spring and found it very difficult. To begin with it was hard to find a way to hold the spring. Also the hard spring steel was next to impossible to cut into with the drill bits I had available. After letting me wrestle with the problem for quite a while my mentor brought out the Ferree's punch and said, "why don't you try this". It made it quite easy. His teaching method was to have me try everything I could come up with and fail and then show me the correct way to do it. He was either being "mean" or trying to make me figure things out on my own---I still haven't decided which. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Back when I was an apprentice I tried drilling a new hole in a flat spring and found it very difficult. To begin with it was hard to find a way to hold the spring. Also the hard spring steel was next to impossible to cut into with the drill bits I had available. After letting me wrestle with the problem for quite a while my mentor brought out the Ferree's punch and said, "why don't you try this". It made it quite easy. His teaching method was to have me try everything I could come up with and fail and then show me the correct way to do it. He was either being "mean" or trying to make me figure things out on my own---I still haven't decided which. ;)
I don't think he was being mean. He was very wise. Young people invariably go through times they think they know better than their elders/teachers. His method meant you would either find a better way on your own without going against his direction (he hadn't yet told you HOW to do it) or he would prove his superior knowledge. Win win.

If I thought I might end up needing lots of these springs, I'd definitely invest in a punch going by all replies so far, but it's a bit hard to justify giving this might well be the one and only time I encounter this type of spring given their apparent rarity out there.

Tony.
1/4" cordless drill motor and a set of teeny twist drills from MSC Supply or McMaster-Carr; a small vise and soft jaws for same. Second holes - done!
Thanks, I'm leaning towards drilling a second hole using a drill press on it's slowest speed.

Tony
 

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Have you considered drilling and tapping the key for a different spring? Might either of the two smaller holes be in an acceptible location to use a spring with a single hole?
 

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Back when I was an apprentice I tried drilling a new hole in a flat spring and found it very difficult. To begin with it was hard to find a way to hold the spring. Also the hard spring steel was next to impossible to cut into with the drill bits I had available.
I've tried this as well. With different drills and drill bits. Not even the dental micro motor did more than scratch the surface at a very high speed and high quality bit. Spring punch is the only reasonable way to do this job.
 
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