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Heys guys,

I usually play a STM 7*. I recently bought a Dukoff D7 for my tenor, I play in a rock band and want some punch.

Anyway, I like the easy volume and attack of the Dukoff, but the sound is HARSH. I practice in an enclosed space(my car), and it's not so pleasing on the ears. When I go back to the link it's like going from a hair shirt to a nice warm bath.

I assume that my tone on the Dukoff will improve, feels like you have to work a bit harder in terms of embrochure(?).

My question is: Is this harsh tone what is needed to cut through in a band situation? Does the harshness of the tone get lost in the mix so to speak? I'm wondering how some of the famous Dukoff growlers sound in the practice room. Can you have the best of both worlds?

barry
 

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Get another Link and add a dental wax baffle. You don't have to have a Dukoff to project in a rock band.

Besides I agree Dukoffs have a hideous tone. You can work on your sound with the Dukoff, but compared to the thick fat tone you can get out of Link it sounds like garbage. For me these types of mouthpieces totally distort the natural sound.

Aside from that metal Dukoffs are one of the poorest examples of mouthpiece manufacturing there is today. I don't know how Dukoff has gotten away with making these this way for so long. There's better pieces for rock if you have to have one specifically for that genre.
 

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I agree with Heath. I used to put baffles in Links and they worked great; don't know why I got away from it. I know this is personal, but I can't stand the metal, ("Silverite"), that the Dukoffs are made of. Feels weird to me, though many people love 'em; go figure.......
 

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Or try a Guardala Crescent which is like a Link with a baffle. There are two drawbacks to the dental wax idea; intonation goes out the window and if you have any hot outdoor summer gigs, the stuff will melt and come loose. I had this happen to me one time!! Not fun to be playing and have that sudden back pressure.
 

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If he needs a screeching mpc than the cresent isn't going to cut it.

There's lots of mouthpieces, but if you're using a metal link than having one with a permanent baffle added with epoxy won't feel so foreign to you. You could switch off between the two for legit jazz gigs(if you ever do these) and use the baffled one for it's purpose as well. Plus I've found with a baffled STM the tone is much more round than a dukoff and you'll retain that fat bottom end that seems to suffer with dukoff's. Also dukoffs tend to have a razor thin upper register that a baffled link wouldn't have if it was executed properly.
 

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When I work on a tenor Dukoff, I usually open the throat area, remove the "wart", and lower the baffle some near the tip to fatten up the sound some. I have some photos on my site of the rework. Point is, you can get there starting with a Duk too.
 

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Mouthpieces a loud as a Dukoff were not meant to be played in a space as small as a car. Try it out with the rock band you play with.
 

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With the right choice of reeds and emboucure experimentation, a Dukoff D7 is a very musical sounding and flexible mouthpiece. I've had one since the late 70's and have played it in many situations and it can be made to sound quite nice- harsh isn't what I've experienced. Listen to Boots Randolf stuff and you'll hear what I'm talking about.The harshest, most ear-splitting mouthpiece I ever played was a metal Beechler Bellite. If your Dukoff sounds like that one, you have my sympathy!!:cry:
 

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Honeyboy said:
With the right choice of reeds and emboucure experimentation, a Dukoff D7 is a very musical sounding and flexible mouthpiece. I've had one since the late 70's and have played it in many situations and it can be made to sound quite nice- harsh isn't what I've experienced. Listen to Boots Randolf stuff and you'll hear what I'm talking about.The harshest, most ear-splitting mouthpiece I ever played was a metal Beechler Bellite. If your Dukoff sounds like that one, you have my sympathy!!:cry:
He gets a darker sound because of the large tip opening IMHO.

Eric Marienthal sounds great on his Beechler.
 

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hakukani said:
He gets a darker sound because of the large tip opening IMHO.

Eric Marienthal sounds great on his Beechler.

Reeds also play a part in this, since Boots plays a Rico Royal and Marienthal plays a Vandoren Blue box.

I had harshness issues with my Dukoff when I first got it, and discovered that they work great with Lavoz an Java reeds. I believe Michael Brecker used at least one of these on his Dukoff.

I later sent the Dukoff to Mojo, and he made it a killer, with a bottom end that plays easily, even using a Java 4. The top end is still not as big as the bottom, but I have never liked the high notes on my tenor anyway.


On a side note, Mojo have you ever heard of an F chamber Dukoff? My instructor has an old Florida one, and it looks exactly like my reworked one.
 

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I agree on the Dukoff sound. I taught at a college about 3 miles from the Dukoff shop. Every sax player had one and to stand up conducting a line of saxes blowing those beasts..........
Try some older Brilharts as they tend to have a good center and a good sound. Jody Jazz?
 

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Martinman said:
On a side note, Mojo have you ever heard of an F chamber Dukoff? My instructor has an old Florida one, and it looks exactly like my reworked one.
No I have never heard of a Dukoff "F".
 

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It is a rare chamber type that was typically a custom order.
 

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I had an SM 7* when I started on tenor and it was a good stared, not too bad. I switched to links some time ago while trying to find that richer sound. I've found that the Barone Hollywood is giving me good presence and cut for the rack but a richer sound.
 

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Instead of trying different mthpcs, and since you are doing the rock thing, why not get yourself a great powered speaker and super cardiod mic and enjoy a mthpc that you like.

-Z
 

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MojoBari said:
When I work on a tenor Dukoff, I usually open the throat area, remove the "wart", and lower the baffle some near the tip to fatten up the sound some. I have some photos on my site of the rework. Point is, you can get there starting with a Duk too.
I have one of the Dukoffs that Mojo did...don't play it much, but it is spectacular at what it does. I just use a mike when I play with amplified instruments.
 

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If you don't like the tone of a Dukoff, just stick with your Link, which is better, in my opinion. You should be providing the 'punch', which is then realized through the Link. If you're playing in a rock band sort out a decent monitoring setup. If you're relying on sound guys, explain that you need to hear yourself clearly, in the same way as a singer.

Buy the way, I used a Dukoff on alto for a long while. I bought it for rock stuff but ended up playing vintage jazz on it for several years - unusual I know. The thing is, I could make it sound very sweet when I needed to, particularly on quiet passages. Your musical approach makes all the difference to the sound.

Having said that; I abandoned the Dukioff many years ago after dropping it! The metal is so soft that the tip was damaged beyond repair. I now play an old Selmer mouthpiece on alto. Works on everything - rock, jazz and straight stuff.

Mouthpieces are, of course, very important but they don't make the player. Your sound is in your head and if the Dukoff won't let you realise it, ditch it. Don't let a mouthpiece hold you back. It should be doing the opposite thing.

If you like your Link, stick with it and develop your own sound. Don't worry too much about what others think - stay true to yourself.

Rant over - I've just got a thing about all this mouthpiece changing nonsense :)
 

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Most of us have been through the Dukoff phase, they seem to work well for some.
My experience is that a kazoo sounds similar, but better. Also, a kazoo is not made of melted down slot machines!
For power with edge try a Jody Jazz ESP with the spoiler fitted.
 

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I think a Dukoff and a Link are a good pair to cover a variety of gigs: jazz, rock, blues, commercial (weddings, etc.). As many have said, Dukoffs vary a lot. When I was looking for a bright piece, I went to a store that had a box of used mouthpieces that included several Dukoffs. Most were lousy, but one was a real gem. Ironically it was the ugliest of the bunch, with many dings and dents.

So you might want to shop around for a better Dukoff if you want that name, but as long as you're going shopping you should look at other bright mouthpieces.
 
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