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Thanks all! I guess maybe soundproofing was the wrong word. I'm not looking to dig into walls or doors or replace things (I'm not all that handy haha!) I guess I'm just looking to "soften" the sound as much as possible easily with what's already there. I know that they'll probably still be able to hear me upstairs and that's fine but anything I can do to dampen it or make it less noticeable would be great!

We're looking to move to the country in 3ish years so after that I can go sit in the pasture and play to my heart's content with no one to complain but the cows lol but until then looking to make a practice space that works as best it can on a budget. Or heck maybe when we build our house I'll design an actual practice room into the plans!

I do think it will help that the house is almost 100 years old and has ridiculously thick walls and high ceilings (so more room between floors.)
Look on eBay for an e-sax. I've seen them mostly for alto saxophones but they are also made for tenor sax.
 
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Hello all,

I have acquired a tenor sax (thanks for all the help on my last post!) now I just need to get started practicing. I searched soundproofing on here and found a lot of comments about adding "mass" but no real recommendations on what materials to use.

Now, I realize it is not possible to completely soundproof a room on a budget but here's my goal: being able to practice without waking my sleeping almost-3 year old or disturbing my husband trying to relax in the evenings.

The location should help on it's own - it's a small room that's in the corner of my basement (roughly 5x7'). My husband will be on the main floor (so one floor above me) and my daughter will be sleeping upstairs (so two floors above me.)

Here are my thoughts so far. Something like these Rockwool panels covering the ceiling:

Acoustic foam panels on the walls:

And then soundproof curtains over the window and door and either carpet tiles or area rugs on the cement floor.

Does this sound like it will be sufficient enough to dampen the sound enough that it's not completely annoying upstairs? Or maybe should I do the rockwool all over and then the foam acoustic panels on top of that?

My other question is do I cover literally all the wall/ceiling space in the stuff so that none of the wall is visible or do I space it out?

Thanks in advance!
I'm getting in late on this discussion, I know, but there is one thing that hasn't been discussed. In the U.S. there's something called Building Standards. Every city has an office with inspectors that can tell you what kind and method of construction/ modification is allowed. I advise anyone living in the U.S. to check with the office of City Ordinances or Building Standards (the two are usually combined and may be called something different). Check with them The considerations are centered around life safety.

If one intends to build a permanent addition or modification, it's best to call to find out what is allowed and what isn't allowed. Failing that, check with someone who actually works in residential construction. If you intend to build something that's temporary and can be disassembled easily, this isn't much of a problem.
 

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I'm getting in late on this discussion, I know, but there is one thing that hasn't been discussed. In the U.S. there's something called Building Standards. Every city has an office with inspectors that can tell you what kind and method of construction/ modification is allowed. I advise anyone living in the U.S. to check with the office of City Ordinances or Building Standards (the two are usually combined and may be called something different). Check with them The considerations are centered around life safety.

If one intends to build a permanent addition or modification, it's best to call to find out what is allowed and what isn't allowed. Failing that, check with someone who actually works in residential construction. If you intend to build something that's temporary and can be disassembled easily, this isn't much of a problem.
Something else to consider:
For temporary sound abatement, one might consider using what is called anti-fatigue foam matting. It's used in workshops where the workers must stand for long hours. In the U.S it costs about $8.00 for 17 square feet (at places like Harbor Freight). Four rubber foam pieces interlock like puzzle pieces and can be attached to the walls temporarily using various means. I blocked my office window with it to quiet the sound of a very old central air conditioner compressor unit that was below my office window. Before I replaced the unit, it sounded much like a 747 taking off. The mats killed the sound.

When I began playing the oboe again, I wanted to be sure that my neighbors couldn't hear me doing what sounded like killing ducks, so covered the office door with it. Very little sound escapes to the rest of the house and none of it escapes to the outside. It works well with taming the sound of the saxophone though it can still be heard outside but not so much that it might disturb the neighbors.
 
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