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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone built a soundproofed practice room? How much was it? How difficult was it to do? Any tips and tricks on how to make a 10 x 10 space soundproof?
 

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Just a guy who plays saxophone.
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Welcome!
Room inside a room is the best but typically most expensive and labor intensive way, particularly if you have to worry about noise through the floor.
there are hundreds of threads on this topic, many going into great detail, in the archives. you can search them using the “search community” utility at the top of every page just below the header.
 

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I have a professionally built booth. It costs around 60.000 SEK new. Mine was used when I got it for a lot cheaper.
I considered building one before that. I realized that a homebuilt booth will never be as soundproof as I wanted it to be.
It should be a rather easy build if you are good at construction. But it will take many hours. It will also not be cheap. It will be a difficult project though if you have none or little experience with construction.
Here are some useful links that i gathered before I found my pro booth:

Designing a Vocal Booth | Acoustic Sound Booth | Primacoustic
http://www.trustmeimascientist.com/...-room-when-you-have-no-idea-what-youre-doing/
Recording Magazine: The Magazine For the Recording Musician
D.I.Y. Budget Isolation Booth - Gearslutz
Building a 'professional' vocal booth - pics added soon! - Gearslutz
Home Studio Soundproofing
Building a practice room [illustrated]
Building soundproof cabin
Soundproof booth STUDIOBOX - Modular Acoustic Studio
Soundproofing
Acousticel R10 - Acousticel, R10, recycled, soundproofing mat, floating floors, impact noise reduction
Product not found! -
http://www.greengluecompany.com/tech...ort_order=DESC - glue for soundproofing (don't know if it actually works)
http://www.bobgolds.com/Mode/RoomModes.htm
http://www.bobgolds.com/PaulsDoor/home.htm
 

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Has anyone built a soundproofed practice room? How much was it? How difficult was it to do? Any tips and tricks on how to make a 10 x 10 space soundproof?
In order to fully sound proof a room you have to make it air tight. Obviously you will need a mechanical air circulation system or you will suffocate.

In order to build your own, you have to build it like you would a recording studio, with a room within a room method, with an air gap between the two outer walls and acoustic insulation like rock wool or OC703 in the air gap between the walls. You can gain a 63dB reduction in sound transmission if you do it right. But you will need mechanical air circulation.

There's a few "off the shelf" iso booths, check out Whisper Room. They're on the expensive side though, and are not 100% sound proof.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Has anyone built a soundproofed practice room? How much was it? How difficult was it to do? Any tips and tricks on how to make a 10 x 10 space soundproof?
In saying soundproof, I think I might be overdoing. What I need is a place to practice my sax when my wife is working and my son is home online school. It used to be perfect. I am off the mornings so could play for a couple hours every day and not bother anyone. Now..... this is ridiculous and I need to find a solution. Perhaps what I am looking for is more of a sound muffled room. I don't want mechanical stuff having to go into it.
 

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Keilwerth saxes (S/A/T), Selmer clarinets (S/B), Altus Azumi flute
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In saying soundproof, I think I might be overdoing. What I need is a place to practice my sax when my wife is working and my son is home online school. It used to be perfect. I am off the mornings so could play for a couple hours every day and not bother anyone. Now..... this is ridiculous and I need to find a solution. Perhaps what I am looking for is more of a sound muffled room. I don't want mechanical stuff having to go into it.
The same ideas above (i.e., of a "room within a room") still apply, even for a smaller level of sound reduction. You need mass and an air gap.

I personally use one of the Whisperrooms referenced by @JCBigler for this purpose. It's a single-walled unit and might not be quite enough if I had to use it in, say, a studio apartment, but I have it sitting in a separate room on a concrete slab and it does a great job. I frequently practice when my wife is sleeping and she can't hear me from the bedroom unless I'm playing very loudly and she makes a concerted effort to listen.
 

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If you just put sound-absorbent materials (which are exepensive) - that will muffle the room. But not by many dB. You need to "trap" the sound within the room - therefor a room within a room is the best way to go. Not even a soundproof booth is 100% soundproof. Still, my booth reduces the sound so much that my neighbours can't hear me.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I personally use one of the Whisperrooms referenced by @JCBigler for this purpose. It's a single-walled unit and might not be quite enough if I had to use it in, say, a studio apartment, but I have it sitting in a separate room on a concrete slab and it does a great job. I frequently practice when my wife is sleeping and she can't hear me from the bedroom unless I'm playing very loudly and she makes a concerted effort to listen.
What size of room did you end up getting for practicing in? I am afraid if I go too small the echo inside the room will be terrible. I am almost thinking of just putting up 3 plywood sheets to the ceiling, getting some foam sheets and covering the inside. Leave a gap by the wall to get in and out of. I just need something to muffle the sax so I don't interfere with the other people around me. I am still in the basement and it is a house, so I don't have ot worry about neighbours... or care really.... just more the inside people
 

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Keilwerth saxes (S/A/T), Selmer clarinets (S/B), Altus Azumi flute
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What size of room did you end up getting for practicing in? I am afraid if I go too small the echo inside the room will be terrible. I am almost thinking of just putting up 3 plywood sheets to the ceiling, getting some foam sheets and covering the inside. Leave a gap by the wall to get in and out of. I just need something to muffle the sax so I don't interfere with the other people around me. I am still in the basement and it is a house, so I don't have ot worry about neighbours... or care really.... just more the inside people
I got the 4' x 6' room. Echo is not a problem inside the room, but I've treated it with 2" eco-core sound panels from Acoustimac. If you build your own box, you should definitely get something more than foam (e.g., rockwool/fiberglass or cotton-core panels). The standard thin foam will cut the echo for the highest frequencies, but won't do much otherwise.
 

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What I need is a place to practice my sax when my wife is working and my son is home online school. It used to be perfect. I am off the mornings so could play for a couple hours every day and not bother anyone. Now..... this is ridiculous and I need to find a solution. Perhaps what I am looking for is more of a sound muffled room. I don't want mechanical stuff having to go into it.
I was in a similar situation when the pandemic hit. Everyone at home suddenly and no more practice time. My challenge was to build a room that would allow me to practice while my partner was on a conference call, my older kids were remote schooling and my four year old was napping.

I sought out advice and did a lot of research and succeeded in building a practice room that meets (and exceeds!) these expectations.

Here's what I did:

I picked the furthest room. I was lucky to have a section with exterior walls in the basement far away from where everyone else is in the house. The space is not square (alcove) and about 9'x7'.

I closed in the space with a wall of 2x6s and staggered 2x4s (stuffed with Rockwool "Safe'n'Sound") on which I put two layers of 5/8" drywall bound with acoustic glue (Green Glue) between the panels. Before putting up the panels, I closed all gaps with acoustic sealant.

I repurposed an exterior door and framed it in squared 2x6s.

I built acoustic panels using framing lumber, left over Rockwool "Safe'n'Sound" and landscaping fabric.

Total cost was under $500.

The room is awesome and I use it everyday, I even do some remote teaching from there.

I say it exceeds my expectations because I set up a drum set and a Marshall DSL 40C and I can be in there jamming away without disturbing anyone. This being said, it's not soundproof! If you stand in the next room it's quite loud (I'll need to work on the door if this ever bothers me) but as you walk further away, sound gets progressively softer until it pretty much fades away by the time you get to my daughter's room.

I'm happy to share more information if you want to know anything else.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I was in a similar situation when the pandemic hit. Everyone at home suddenly and no more practice time. My challenge was to build a room that would allow me to practice while my partner was on a conference call, my older kids were remote schooling and my four year old was napping.

I sought out advice and did a lot of research and succeeded in building a practice room that meets (and exceeds!) these expectations.

Here's what I did:

I picked the furthest room. I was lucky to have a section with exterior walls in the basement far away from where everyone else is in the house. The space is not square (alcove) and about 9'x7'.

I closed in the space with a wall of 2x6s and staggered 2x4s (stuffed with Rockwool "Safe'n'Sound") on which I put two layers of 5/8" drywall bound with acoustic glue (Green Glue) between the panels. Before putting up the panels, I closed all gaps with acoustic sealant.

I repurposed an exterior door and framed it in squared 2x6s.

I built acoustic panels using framing lumber, left over Rockwool "Safe'n'Sound" and landscaping fabric.

Total cost was under $500.

The room is awesome and I use it everyday, I even do some remote teaching from there.

I say it exceeds my expectations because I set up a drum set and a Marshall DSL 40C and I can be in there jamming away without disturbing anyone. This being said, it's not soundproof! If you stand in the next room it's quite loud (I'll need to work on the door if this ever bothers me) but as you walk further away, sound gets progressively softer until it pretty much fades away by the time you get to my daughter's room.

I'm happy to share more information if you want to know anything else.
This is what I need to do. I have a basement, with one wall facing the garage. I will build 3 walls around it and put a door on the side that faces away from the stairs. It should be good enough. What really has to happen is everyone needs to get their freaking vaccines so we can end this draconian lockdown, get my kid out of the house and back to school and the same with my wife and I have my practice area back without spending the money. however, this isn't happening soon so.... :-(
 

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Has anyone built a soundproofed practice room? How much was it? How difficult was it to do? Any tips and tricks on how to make a 10 x 10 space soundproof?
About 20yrs ago i built a kind of sound proof box in the spare room of my flat/apartment but it was about 6'x 8'

From what I remember from research at the time was that dense materials are the best absorbers of sound waves.
Dense means heavy - bare that in mind, you don't want to end up in your downstairs neighbours apartment!

Lead and concrete ideal but realistic and practical build materials are plasterboard and thick MDF.
I built the walls, ceiling and floor units as you would a stud wall but with MDF inside, doubled and staggered plasterboard outside, cavity filled with rockwool insulation - the MDF gave the structure strength.

No window. No door - I hung one wall on heavy duty hinges and supported it with a coaster wheel. aside from the door wall, everything was sealed with silicon and I used some kind of draft exclude material for the door seal.

The air conditioning was a bit funky - I had a fan such air out of the top (in from bottom) via plasterboard boxes i made with rat-run, maze like inner walls to trap the sound. It all worked okay (80-90% reduction at a guess) - no complaints from neighbours anyway.

It was a nightmare to dismantle when I sold the flat.
 
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