Sax on the Web Forum banner
41 - 53 of 53 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
947 Posts
Discussion Starter · #41 ·
Thanks Heath,

My shopping is wide open to anything right now, so thanks for the insights.
I like to get a bunch of info and opinions before I go and playtest. It’s just the process I like.
Sometimes nothing said here matters (as in the case of my MK VII tenor, but I find it useful.
My current cheap sop gets me close to what I’m looking for sound wise, so I know I can achieve what I am looking for.
Other than “My Favorite Things” there is an even “honkier” turn by Coltrane “Untitled Original 11386”.
Love this piece. Now tell me he’s playing tenor on this one and I’ll give up my quest. Hahahah
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
525 Posts
The pinch point in a sop is the body octave pip - after that, it is a smooth shot out the neck. If you use a Shove-It, there is no difference.
I've had so many techs tell me that shove-it is a mistake that I've stopped using them, I use pull-through swabs on necks and mouthpieces. The techs say that shove-it actually keeps moisture in the horn longer. Not to debate, I'm no tech, other than keeping them clean and tightening the occasional loose screw, all I do is play them.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
291 Posts
Thanks Heath,

My shopping is wide open to anything right now, so thanks for the insights.
I like to get a bunch of info and opinions before I go and playtest. It's just the process I like.
Sometimes nothing said here matters (as in the case of my MK VII tenor, but I find it useful.
My current cheap sop gets me close to what I'm looking for sound wise, so I know I can achieve what I am looking for.
Other than "My Favorite Things" there is an even "honkier" turn by Coltrane "Untitled Original 11386".
Love this piece. Now tell me he's playing tenor on this one and I'll give up my quest. Hahahah
No, Coltrane isn't playing tenor on that track. Ha! The track that I was thinking of was Vilia on the '63 set, but on the next track, Untitled Original 11383 he sounds "honky" again.

I've never played a Mark VII tenor. I had a Keilwerth SX90R tenor for years, but sold it when I stopped playing tenor to focus on soprano. I've read that a few Mark VII tenors were excellent.

I'm still a big Coltrane fan. I think that I have all of his albums and I still listen to him regularly. It's difficult for me to listen to Coltrane and not think three things:
1. He is awesome.
2. I suck.
3. I need to practice more.

It's difficult not to be pulled into Coltrane's immense gravity! I then quickly switch to Lester Young, Dexter Gordon, Coleman Hawkins, Steve Lacy, Charlie Parker, Evan Parker, Dave Liebman, or someone else to realize that Coltrane was awesome, but there are other types of awesome. However, Coltrane will always loom large in my playing and life.

Good luck with your quest!
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
291 Posts
How the hell did he do that????!!!!
Ugh!
Track 11383 is an intense track like My Favorite Things and Vilia is more ballad like, which could account partly for the difference. His live tracks always seem to have more honk than his studio tracks. He might have backed of the mic and moved his bell in the studio. Maybe McCoy Tyner knows what Coltrane was doing.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member and Sax Historian
Joined
·
517 Posts
I have been professionally playing Buescher curved sopranos (silver and gold) for over 40 years in all kinds of classical venues and they have served me well. Recently I have added a new Rampone curved soprano to my performance sopranos and I am delighted with the results. I achieve 95% of the sound quality of the Bueschers (rich, lyrical, not nasal, consistent top to bottom, etc) but with the benefit of modern ergonomics. The Rampones have a bore design closer to the vintage bores than other modern sopranos, bringing me that much closer to that sound.
Paul Cohen
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts
I was shopping for sopranos in the New York/New Jersey area in January. I tried everything I could get my hands on at the local shops including KBsax, USA Horn, Roberto's, and various Sam Ash stores. I definitely was a fan of the keywork of the modern horns, favored the straight one piece design. For me, these horns were so much easier to play, but then again the first horn I owned was a Bundy II and my second horn was a Yamaha.

I had a very difficult time deciding on Selmer vs Yany vs Yamaha. Ultimately, a deal came up on a new Yamaha YSS82Z. I think the 82Z is marvelous, but I've seen very little commentary about it over the last several years. Also, the 82Z was less available than the other horns.

Between Kim Bock at KB Sax and Roberto you'll find a great selection of sopranos to play. They're both friendly and will give you plenty of time to play test. If you're still not able to find something, Mark will see you, but be ready to buy, he doesn't suffer fools kindly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
947 Posts
Discussion Starter · #48 ·
I was shopping for sopranos in the New York/New Jersey area in January. I tried everything I could get my hands on at the local shops including KBsax, USA Horn, Roberto's, and various Sam Ash stores. I definitely was a fan of the keywork of the modern horns, favored the straight one piece design. For me, these horns were so much easier to play, but then again the first horn I owned was a Bundy II and my second horn was a Yamaha.

I had a very difficult time deciding on Selmer vs Yany vs Yamaha. Ultimately, a deal came up on a new Yamaha YSS82Z. I think the 82Z is marvelous, but I've seen very little commentary about it over the last several years. Also, the 82Z was less available than the other horns.

Between Kim Bock at KB Sax and Roberto you'll find a great selection of sopranos to play. They're both friendly and will give you plenty of time to play test. If you're still not able to find something, Mark will see you, but be ready to buy, he doesn't suffer fools kindly.
Yes, dropping a horn at Roberto's this week and will check out what he has, and am due for a trip to KB (I desipse bridges to Queens/LI/Brooklyn, hahahaha).
That is the other thing I don't like about USA horn, it seems like there is pressure that if he is going to open up for you you better buy something.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts
That's definitely true, but if you call Mark and he has something you think might work for you, he'll make sure it's ready to go. I've both bought from Mark and walked away. He's frustrated about people buying on the internet and doesn't want to be a showroom. At the end of the day, you've got to do what's right for you.
 

·
Registered
Keilwerth saxes (S/A/T), Selmer clarinets (S/B), Altus Azumi flute
Joined
·
2,027 Posts
If you are willing to travel to NJ, there's also Dillon Music, which is about 8 miles south of USA Horn, in Woodbridge. They have regular hours, a good selection of horns (more than what is listed on their website), and no pressure to buy.

I tried out horns there, in addition to Roberto's, KB, etc., last year when I was shopping for a new soprano (as recounted in this thread).

They are very accommodating and they have a bunch of practice rooms in which you can playtest the horns. I think I spent 2 hours trying horns when I was there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
947 Posts
Discussion Starter · #51 ·
If you are willing to travel to NJ, there's also Dillon Music, which is about 8 miles south of USA Horn, in Woodbridge. They have regular hours, a good selection of horns (more than what is listed on their website), and no pressure to buy.

I tried out horns there, in addition to Roberto's, KB, etc., last year when I was shopping for a new soprano (as recounted in this thread).

They are very accommodating and they have a bunch of practice rooms in which you can playtest the horns. I think I spent 2 hours trying horns when I was there.
Yes, been to Dillion's a few times. Will pass there too!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,019 Posts
I don't see the value in a detachable neck quite frankly for sops. Adds more issues than needed.
I've never said "gee, I wish my sop was at a 20 degree angle from here".
I gather it's much harder to manufacture a single piece within the very precise tolerances required. Removable necks solve the problem whilst offering the consumer options, as they're easier to make.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
VI Soprano, Searchlight Alto, TH&C Tenor
Joined
·
1,376 Posts
i can't recall any complaints of the familiar American vintage outside of watching out for the longer Conns. great sounds, they got to be about the best bang for the buck over the long haul. of course there's always the chance of a particular Chinese/Taiwanese bargain. i read good stuff about the Superba I being the best Couf. some enthusiasm for the Selmer II, etc. 'course i got no doubt that for a few grand the current name makers, including the two familiar Japanese, won't let you down with something new.
the Selmer VI soprano does not share the same acclaim of it's sibs. (Matt points out that it's build is not much different from late '20's-early Super models.) you can find them for 3K or less if you shop carefully. thing is, there are great sounding VIs all over a whole bunch of notable recordings after Coltrane sort of brought it back, through Miles and fusion, (some) ECM, Kenny, '80's film soundtracks, etc. yep, vintage ergos, and by far the best horn i've ever played. caveat emptor.
 
41 - 53 of 53 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top