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Discussion Starter #1
Hi:

I posted this in another thread but haven’t gotten many replies so I hope it’s ok to post this here:

Looking to get a soprano. Had an Antigua sop a while ago and unfortunately let it go. Looking to get a good soprano to play as a hobby. May get the Kessler sop new as well as maybe Antigua but also looking at used Yamaha 475ii on line. Three related questions:

1) It sounds to me that I’m taking a chance getting a used horn since I guess I can’t be sure of the condition?

2) Am I correct in assuming that probably the Kessler sax is my best choice (regarding the Yamaha vs Kessler) since it’s new, less expensive, and from Kessler who has a great reputation?

3) Where might Antigua saxes fit into the equation?

Thanks !
 

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I have an Antigua Pro one. Best Taiwan soprano that I have played. You need to be more specific on the models and budget range? One thing you should know is that Kessler top models are very similar if not the same as Allora Paris series. Why limit yourself to just those?
 

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1) It sounds to me that I’m taking a chance getting a used horn since I guess I can’t be sure of the condition?
Just make sure you can return it if unsatisfied. If not, don't make the deal.

I haven't played a Kessler stencil, but should your interest in soprano as a hobby wane, you won't get half your money back selling it. If you go for a decent used horn, you can generally get the value back that you initially paid should you need to move it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you all the replies. I guess my budget is limited to about $1,000. Won’t really limit my shopping to the name brands I mentioned, but my lack of knowledge of what is out there is what is limiting my present search...
 

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I have a strait Yani a nice older conn and a Borgani all wonderful but have trouble with straight ones due to a right hand thumb injury. On a whim I ordered a Kessler custom curved and must say The Kessler is a great instrument I have no idea how they can sell that good of a sax that cheap. My recomendation it the Kessler and a good mouthpiece.
 

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… but my lack of knowledge of what is out there is what is limiting my present search...
Are you on the east coast? The Navy Band Saxophone Symposium comes up next month in Fairfax Virginia. You can try dozens of different sopranos in the vendor room, old and new.
 

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Kessler is a great horn for the money, but you will never get the re-sale value out of it. You also need to consider whether you like straight or curved (I can't play a modern straight soprano, too darn heavy for me).

Keep in mind the Kessler curved is pretty much (more or less) the same as WWBW's Allora curved soprano and the Chateau curved from Tenon (was told by Dave Kessler that Tenon makes all three).

Cannonball, P. Mauriat, Phil Barone and I am sure some I left off also make curved and straight soprano saxophones, but brand new these are above the $1000 range limit you stated.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thank you all for your input. Going for the Kessler. It sounds like a quality sop well within my price range, and I can always upgrade. Best of the new year to you all! 🎷
 

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Thank you all for your input. Going for the Kessler. It sounds like a quality sop well within my price range, and I can always upgrade. Best of the new year to you all! 🎷
I've had my duel necked Kessler for about 7 years now. It's been a very maintenance free horn holding up well to the rigors of the road. They're a great horn for the money, and a great player by every measurable standard. That said, I would totally jump on a 475 (or any) Yamaha soprano that's being sold for $1,000 or less in good condition. One thing to note is that a soprano with a solid neck has one less area to leak, and is generally a tad more responsive, with the trade-off of being slightly less ergonomics than any bent neck design. Going back to Kessler, I've found their keyboard layout to be the most ergonomic of any soprano that I've ever played.
 
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