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bobsax said:
What do you all think of this? I know the seller but don't have any monetary interest in his sales. <snip url>
I don't think the corks are enthusiastic about continuous compression, nor are the tenons keen on keeping their end grain not thoroughly dried. (I can't imagine the clarinet being disassembled for cleaning but not for transportation).
I can't think of what happens to the instrument (especially the sockets and tenons) if you drop the case and it lands diagonally on its edge.
Besides, it's not really compact.

However, I see one good use for the case: to keep a doubler's instrument well tempered (pardon the pun) so that it stays in tune.
 

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I like it for my Silver King metal Bb soprano clarinet. My original King case was chewed up by rodents (before I acquired it) so the outside is not good, the latches are unreliable, and the handle is gone. This case might just work for me. It appears there is a small accessories pouch on the top, too. That would hold the second tuning barrel that came with the Silver King.

Thanks for the link - I think I'll order one. DAVE
 

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Discussion Starter #4
tictactux said:
I don't think the corks are enthusiastic about continuous compression, nor are the tenons keen on keeping their end grain not thoroughly dried. (I can't imagine the clarinet being disassembled for cleaning but not for transportation).
I can't think of what happens to the instrument (especially the sockets and tenons) if you drop the case and it lands diagonally on its edge.
Besides, it's not really compact.
.
Hmm..yes I see your point. I don't think it would be good for wood clarinets.
However For beginning students with plastic clarinets it may be a good thing if it makes it easier for them to get to their instrument and play.
As far as damage goes I suppose it comes down to the potential damage ratio between;
1)damaging the instrument while putting it together from a traditional case or
2) dropping the straight case.
I don't think cork compression would be a big deal. If the joints got wobbly there's always tape and cork is not that expensive to replace.
On a slightly different subject ;
Regarding cork I know most folks say you should remove your mouthpiece from the neck but for the last 30 some years I've always left my mouthpiece on the sax neck and hardly ever need a new cork. The price of a new cork is cheap compared to a fixing or replacing a dropped mouthpiece.
 

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bobsax said:
Regarding cork I know most folks say you should remove your mouthpiece from the neck but for the last 30 some years I've always left my mouthpiece on the sax neck and hardly ever need a new cork. The price of a new cork is cheap compared to a fixing or replacing a dropped mouthpiece.
A sax neck is conical with a comparably large surface - if it starts to wobble, just push the mouthpiece in some more. The most critical cork in clarinets is the tenon cork between upper and lower joint. It is relatively small in diameter, and the bending forces exerted from both hands are considerable. I wouldn't worry about the mouthpiece cork either.
 

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I've seen any number of old Albert and Boehm horns, both soprano and bass, and you can always tell the horns that were "kept together" all of the time. First, the corks are all destroyed. Second, the joints that are most likely to be "stuck" are the ones that get damaged and that shows it in the horn's later life. Nothing like trying to get one unstuck.

One of the clarinets that I've bought over the years was a quality metal Selmer. On the website, it looked very good.

Mechanically it worked just fine, but the barrel showed the obvious signs of being stuck and having to be wrenched apart with some sort of pliers. Not fatal damage, but not the sort of state of perfection that I'm used to with my horns.

Break the thing down, clean it out, and put it away...
 

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I bought the case and it arrived today. Not bad, for the price. It is similar to a Pro-Tec (ballistic-nylon-like cover, hard frame, zippered closure with two security straps and the handle wraps around itself with a velcro closure). There is an accessories-pouch (zippered) on top. The case is lightweight.

I put my metal Silver King clarinet in it and it fit securely enough. The inside of the case is molded to allow for a mouthpiece affixed to the horn, but I always remove my mouthpieces from horns, so there is an open space between the top of the clarinet's tuning barrel and the provided shaped space inside. I'll keep it and use it. DAVE
 

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I wonder if the average student will want to carry a case like that. Isn't part of band programs to teach how to assamble/care for/desemble and play? How is taking the clarinet out in one piece and putting it back in one piece helping anything.

For one piece vintage horns ok, metal i mean, but even a clarinet like the Rossi, which has a one piece body, still needs the bell removed for storage, this seems to me another lazy attempt to please the already lazy school music system in this counrty.
 

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Dave Dolson said:
I bought the case and it arrived today. Not bad, for the price. It is similar to a Pro-Tec (ballistic-nylon-like cover, hard frame, zippered closure with two security straps and the handle wraps around itself with a velcro closure). There is an accessories-pouch (zippered) on top. The case is lightweight.

I put my metal Silver King clarinet in it and it fit securely enough. The inside of the case is molded to allow for a mouthpiece affixed to the horn, but I always remove my mouthpieces from horns, so there is an open space between the top of the clarinet's tuning barrel and the provided shaped space inside. I'll keep it and use it. DAVE


Dave do you see it as a case for a wood clarinet also?
 

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Simon: I believe as many of the others who posted here already expressed . . . I take my wood clarinet apart after I play it and store it in a standard clarinet case. I don't think I'd leave my good clarinet attached.

However, maybe a student who had a student-line plastic clarinet COULD use a case like the one discussed here. But even then, keeping the corks compressed might not be wise. I just don't know.

For anyone with a metal clarinet, though - this case would work. DAVE
 

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Simon Weiner said:
Dave do you see it as a case for a wood clarinet also?
If I recall correctly it is fitted to the customary wood bodied clarinet, or the double walled metal clarinets. If it was for the traditional skinny metal I'd probably spring for one for my metal, but I'd never do that to a wooden instrument.
 

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Carl: I think you are correct about the interior being fitted for a regular-bodied clarinet. But my slim Silver King fits fine . . . the bell-area is probably the key to stabalizing it within the fitted area, plus all the levers, etc. on any clarinet touch at enough spots to aid in that process.

Like I've said in many posts about cases, I don't intend to toss it, drop it, stack things on top of it, or do anything that may happen to harm an instrument inside a case, so I'm not too concerned about exact fit.

My metal clarinet fits and I needed a new case for it. I haven't seen anything else available, so I went for it - on the chance that it would work. It does. DAVE
 
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