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Thanks for sharing. It would be interesting to know how long it took Patrick to play the oboe with a single reed and if he had oboe experience beforehand. If you can play the instrument as a sax player without much practice it might be an interesting option if someone needs to double on an oboe. However, if you can actually play the oboe, I am not sure about the benefit of a single reed.

BTW, here is the direct link for the video, if anybody can't find it through Kymarto's duckduckgo link:
 

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selmer 26 nino, 22 curved sop, super alto, King Super 20 and Martin tenors, Stowasser tartogatos
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Thanks for sharing. It would be interesting to know how long it took Patrick to play the oboe with a single reed and if he had oboe experience beforehand. If you can play the instrument as a sax player without much practice it might be an interesting option if someone needs to double on an oboe. However, if you can actually play the oboe, I am not sure about the benefit of a single reed.

BTW, here is the direct link for the video, if anybody can't find it through Kymarto's duckduckgo link:
He is an oboe player. As an oboe player for many years, and a sax player as well, including sop and nino, I know the differences in feel between single and double reeds. They vibrate very differently. The single reed if flat and when it oscillates it does so in a planar manner. The double reed is curved, and oscillates by bending the reed inwards with the corners fixed and touching each other. IMO you can never get a really good clean oboe sound with a single reed because it responds very differently to changes in embouchure pressure. That is why, I guess, that the single reed mpc for oboe never really was successful.
 

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As an oboe (and bassoon) doubler for many years, in my opinion the double reed emboucher is the least of the problems in playing these instruments. Reed making and adjusting for pitch, timber and response are far more critical, not to mention technical considerations of fingering. After all, the ultimate goal of any doubler should be to play at a level technically and tonally that the listener will be unable to detect which is your principal instrument. To handicap yourself by using a single reed setup on either of these instruments is to set yourself up for failure at the outset, and make what should be your goal in playing these instrument harder, or actually more or less impossible to attain. There are truly no shortcuts in becoming a truly skilled woodwind doubler! It takes hard work and good teachers, and dedication. Just my two cents.
 

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As an oboe (and bassoon) doubler for many years, in my opinion the double reed emboucher is the least of the problems in playing these instruments. Reed making and adjusting for pitch, timber and response are far more critical, not to mention technical considerations of fingering. After all, the ultimate goal of any doubler should be to play at a level technically and tonally that the listener will be unable to detect which is your principal instrument. To handicap yourself by using a single reed setup on either of these instruments is to set yourself up for failure at the outset, and make what should be your goal in playing these instrument harder, or actually more or less impossible to attain. There are truly no shortcuts in becoming a truly skilled woodwind doubler! It takes hard work and good teachers, and dedication. Just my two cents.
I agree 100%. When I started oboe in high school, I was already playing clarinet, alto sax, and baritone sax. It was no easy feat to make the switch but I accepted the challenge.

There is/was a single reed mouthpiece made for the oboe but to me it makes the instrument sound like a duck call.

My suggestion that the student learn to make his own reeds was shot down by some on another thread but I believe that one important step for an oboist to learn control the instrument is to learn to make his own reeds. (That and practicing playing long tones). Starting on a store-bought reed is okay but after awhile it becomes limiting. There are hand made custom reeds for sale but it doesn't take long to see how prohibitively expensive that route is.

Practice!
 
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there are single reed oboe mouthpieces ( they exist for bassoon as well) there is no need to adapt a soprano mouthpiece

Right. Thank you for repeating what I said.

oboe


bassoon

 

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Yes, and I have been showing some examples, including information on the brand making this
 
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