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Discussion Starter #1
My highest E and up are not as easy as they used to be. When I have someone lift the octave key higher as I play, they pop in better. How can I tell if I need to take the horn to a tech? Is there a distance measurement a straight soprano is supposed to conform to? The last time I used my tech for an adjustment, he didn't get the octave key to release well enough, and I had to take it back, and he put more pressure on it to make the lower notes be OK. I am just hesitating to go there again if I don't have to, or maybe to find another tech, but perhaps it is just me. Any ideas?

(By the way, I am joining a band that does Dixieland, and I need these notes now, whereas I didn't before in the orchestra I play in. That's why it's a sudden felt need!)
 

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I've played "Dixieland" on soprano saxophone my whole playing career and never had to play the palm notes except on rare occasions when I wanted to, and then only to nail a closing chord.

But to answer your question, have you tried to clear the upper-octave tone hole? Maybe something is stuck in there (it happens). I usually bend a small paper clip so the bent end can shove down through the tone hole.

You didn't tell us the model of soprano you are playing. If it is a dual-neck horn, rather an address any more pressure on that mechanism, maybe a tech could install a slightly thicker plastic sleeve on the upper-octave arm to raise the upper-octave pad cup a bit higher. Just guessing here . . . DAVE
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It's an Antigua Winds X/P. That's a good idea! I will check both these things out! Thanks
 

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If you have a soprano with a detachable neck, there should be no more than about 1/16" (1.5mm) between the loop from the neck octave key and the post that comes up past the saxophone. If the gap is much larger than that, the neck octave may not open sufficiently.

To adjust it, remove the neck, place a popsicle/craft stick under the pad, and carefully push the loop toward the neck with your thumb. Put the neck back on and check.

If you went too far and the neck octave stays open, remove the neck, put your thumb between the loop and the tenon and carefully pull down on the octave key.

You may want to remove the rod holding the octave key on the neck, and push a cotton pipe cleaner through the octave pip followed by closing one end and blowing just in case there is an obstruction inside.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
If you have a soprano with a detachable neck, there should be no more than about 1/16" (1.5mm) between the loop from the neck octave key and the post that comes up past the saxophone. If the gap is much larger than that, the neck octave may not open sufficiently.

To adjust it, remove the neck, place a popsicle/craft stick under the pad, and carefully push the loop toward the neck with your thumb. Put the neck back on and check.

If you went too far and the neck octave stays open, remove the neck, put your thumb between the loop and the tenon and carefully pull down on the octave key.

You may want to remove the rod holding the octave key on the neck, and push a cotton pipe cleaner through the octave pip followed by closing one end and blowing just in case there is an obstruction inside.
It worked! Thanks!
 
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