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How is the proper embouchure on a straight sop? I find it that if I do the same thing as what i do with tenor sax, i can hardly blow :line0: :space0: :line1: it gurgles on them too, but if I found that If I place the mp slightly to the right of my lips (the horn will not point forward but a bit to the right), I can blow all the notes easily.

The soprano mp is so small when I blow sometime I can feel my lips touching the ligature, because it goes deep in my mouth. This also helps the gurgling I can blow all the notes with slight drop on the jaw. But if I change the position of the mp "biting" closer to the tip of the mp, it gurgles.

Please help thanks
 

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Sounds like you need more help than you can get in this forum. find a teacher in your community---take a few lessons. :!:
watch good players play--- AND not kenny g:evil: --keep the mpc in the center:D
 

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I had problems passing from Tenor to sop, too. Two elements which helped my sop emb were:

1. take more of the mpc in : on tenor I play on the tip of the mpc, on soprano I am quite a bit farther in ...

2. the overall embochure is slightly tighter, I find, than on tenor.

... at least, these work with me!

Hang in there,
Laurence
 

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HOUSTON NONET said:
keep the mpc in the center:D
Well, that depends. I try to do so, but since my soprano embouchure is tighter than my tenor, I have troubles with my one tooth that's sticking out above the others. I play as much centered as possible, but if that tooth comes too close to my reed, every note I play jumps an octave.

No, I don't have the money to wear braces for a couple of years, just to see it all go wacky after that again (as my father noticed).
 

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We are all different in our mouths, tomgue, lips, and general music experience. I don't think a teacher is very helpful unless he or she has had a similar physical experience with the mouthpiece. We each have to blow as it suits us. Whatever works works.

All notes above are good but the one about finding a teacher has to be taken with a grain of salt. You could go through 10 teachers and learn 10 techniques that do you no good.

You have already shown a fair amount of experimentation that has taught you some things. Go with the combination of things that work best. If you find an off-center position works best, use it. A little jaw-dropping never hurt anyone. Certainly the tenor can be played with a less-tight mouth than the sop. I'd say chomping on the lig is a bit much but you should bite in further on the sop than on the tenor.

Just bear in mind that the mouth and head configuration has a lot more to do with good sound on the sop than on any other sax because of the high frequencies and very small wave lengths. Holding the head upright is important.
 

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I've seen many good soprano players who play off-center to the right. Sam Rivers comes to mind. I've been doing it myself for 25+ years. It just feels more natural and comfortable for me, your results may vary.
 

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Don't tilt the horn down like a clarinet. Make sure it exits the mouth like an Alto or tenor. Gurggles can be caused by the mouthpiece not being tuned on the cork right. On soprano, a little pulling out or pushing in makes a BIG difference. Also Gurggles can happen if you are using a cheap horn from China.
 

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Tom Goodrick said:
We are all different in our mouths, tomgue, lips, and general music experience. I don't think a teacher is very helpful unless he or she has had a similar physical experience with the mouthpiece. We each have to blow as it suits us. Whatever works works.

All notes above are good but the one about finding a teacher has to be taken with a grain of salt. You could go through 10 teachers and learn 10 techniques that do you no good.

You have already shown a fair amount of experimentation that has taught you some things. Go with the combination of things that work best. If you find an off-center position works best, use it. A little jaw-dropping never hurt anyone. Certainly the tenor can be played with a less-tight mouth than the sop. I'd say chomping on the lig is a bit much but you should bite in further on the sop than on the tenor.

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i respectfuuly disagree.:) go find a pro teacher before you get into bad habits that are hard to break:!:
 

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I'll second that; while everybody is different, and approaches to embouchure will vary slightly, there are still right and wrong ways to play. For somebody just beginning, or having the problems mjs10 mentions, a teacher is crucial. If your lips are touching the ligature, that's a problem. Lorenzo is right, one needs to take more mouthpiece than on tenor, but not swallow the thing.
 

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I had that same gurgling sound on my sop (Maxtone) when I first got it. Took it to a shop and had it adjusted and bought a new mpc (Yamaha 4C) and VanDoren reeds for it. Problem solved. Take it to a reputable shop and have it leak tested.
Just my $.02 worth.
Jon
 

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Whether you look for an instructor depends on where you live. In a large city, a music store or high school band director should be able to point you to a good soprano teacher. In a small city or town, that is unlikely.

I'd like to amend my comments in this way. There is not that much difference between my tenor embouchure and my soprano embouchure. That is partly because the sop mouthpieces I usually use (Selmers) are the exact same diameter as my metal tenor mouthpiece. But the other day when using both horns in the same song, I noticed the tension was about the same and both worked fine.

It certainly is very important to get the proper position of the piece on the cork. If one note is in tune but others are not, the piece is not in the right position.
 

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Tom Goodrick said:
I'd like to amend my comments in this way. There is not that much difference between my tenor embouchure and my soprano embouchure. That is partly because the sop mouthpieces I usually use (Selmers) are the exact same diameter as my metal tenor mouthpiece. But the other day when using both horns in the same song, I noticed the tension was about the same and both worked fine.
So is that as much as to say that the "resistance" on sop and tenor feels similar to you? I'm interested here, because i've always had difficulties switching to soprano from tenor and I wonder if I need to try and work towards this kind of feeling in switching between the two. Could you say exactly what m/p and reed combination you're playing on the two horns?

[EDIT: It's in your sig!! sorry]
 

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Give it time.
First, make sure your sax is well set up, no leaks, etc.
I am convinced that all mouthpieces have a sweet spot, that point at which it wants to play. It may take a while to find it, but you've already got the idea: it's not near the tip. The problem with finding that spot has a lot to do with muscle strength. Can you reliably control you embouchure muscles around that point? You are may be playing off to the side because it's easier there, for now, to get a nice sound. It's also easier to play with your lips nearer the tip. But it's not about easy. Trust that time will strengthen those muscles and reveal the sweet spot to you.
 

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I have always had problems with discomfort in my embouchure and right thumb (even with a neck strap) on straight soprano, so I bought a curved soprano. It solved my problems and now I love playing soprano.
 

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With my sop embouchure, the teeth never touch the mouthpiece. Just lips all the way up to the ligature. It takes slightly different muscles that the tenor for this. But it’s very comfortable. And if my chops get tired, I can shift the mpc to one side. I loose justs a little control by doing this but not very much.

But of above all remember, the straight soprano seems to be much more sensitive to slight pad leaks, maladjustments and mouthpiece setups. Get your horn checked out by a good tech first to make sure it’s working right. Then start with a very basic mpc, such as a Rico Royal Graphtonite B5 (on eBay for $12) and a #2 reed. Build your ability to comfortably play up and down the horn with this simple setup before you go looking for the tone you want.
 

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That's it: build on your ability until you get to just about the sound you want. Then work up from there.
 

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Enviroguy said:
With my sop embouchure, the teeth never touch the mouthpiece. Just lips all the way up to the ligature. It takes slightly different muscles that the tenor for this. But it';s very comfortable. And if my chops get tired, I can shift the mpc to one side. I loose justs a little control by doing this but not very much.
How can your teeth never touch? That sounds odd, but intruiging...
 
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