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Discussion Starter #1
So when I sit down to practice (tenor), generally for an hour or more, the same thing always happens, I get buzzy.
I was using red box Java 2.5s, moved on to Rigotti Gold 2.5M, and 2.5S, and also now have tried BSS 2.5s, on a TW Gaia 3 Metal 6.
And always, at some point in my practice, everything gets buzzy.
The Java's seem to combat this a bit more, the Rigotti's get buzzy the fastest, and the BSS somewhere in between.
So I took out a Legere 2.25 and evertything was clear as a bell.

I do generate a LOT of moisture when playing, and notice if I take the reed off and sort of wipe off the moisture with my lips and re-start, some of the buzziness goes away fro a while.
So, my question is this...am I just a wet player that needs to swap our reeds?
I am by no means a proffessional, and would imagine this does not really happen to pros in the middle of a show, but maybe it does?

I am not crazy about the Legeres as they hurt my lip on the corners, but do I suck it up and build up my lips to deal, or am I doing something wrong with the cane reeds?

Thanks in advance,

John
 

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Moisture won’t make you sound buzzy. It would seem you might be getting a little tired around the hour mark and the tendency/ habit with fatigue is to bite a little (or a lot) to compensate. Biting the tip closer can give a bunch of different and usually unwanted changes.
 

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Buzzy like a lot of edge or buzzy like the crackling sound when you get moisture built up on the back of the reed? I tend to have a lot of the latter and the only thing I know to do is take the reed off and wipe it off. For me it's that crackling/sizzling sound like an old vinyl record with a lot of scratches on it.
 

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I could help when you put more air through the mouthpiece.

For the difference between cane and plastic: I think moisture 'sticks' more easy to cane than to plastic.
 

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I had the same problem. Especially when playing softly, I could hear crackling from the moisture. I eventually changed mouthpieces and the problem was gone. So maybe try a different mouthpiece and see, if the problem persists.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I had the same problem. Especially when playing softly, I could hear crackling from the moisture. I eventually changed mouthpieces and the problem was gone. So maybe try a different mouthpiece and see, if the problem persists.
When i switch to legend synthetic the problem does not happen at all.

It’s not the crackling / static sounding issue, I get that one too over time.
It is a constant buzziness in tone.
Like I had stated, Red Box Java last longer before this happens, and Rigotti’s do it very quickly.
Saxoclease had recommended in a previous post on crackling (I just went back and re-read it) to rub the back of the reed on paper to ‘seal’ the fibers via ‘polishing’.
I will try this and see how it goes next practice.
 

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The metal mouthpiece bacon sizzle.
Make sure your reed is matched up directly with the tip tail.
It’s why I use my Tone Edge on softer gigs. I get the “sizzling bacon” sound on my STM sometimes when I play soft.
I think I just made myself hungry.
 

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Are these with new reeds? I find that if I take a new reed out of the box and play it for more than 20 minutes on the first day, it will get a bit waterlogged and will never quite be the same. For whatever reason, it seems to me like if I just pull out a new reed and play it for more than that, it's very likely that I will kill the reed right then and there. If I build up for a few days before really getting after it on that reed, they'll last a lot longer and not die, which for me makes them buzzy, like the center falls out of the sound.

Synthetics don't do that for me.
 

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Have you checked if the reeds have become warped when that happens? Check with an even glass surface. The solution then would be balancing the reed, with Tom Ridenour’s ATG method and/or the Reed Wizard tool, for example.
The warping usually is the result of the reed achieving its real, wet balance, and should be addresses from the top of the reed, the curved side. I would not scrape and even the bottom out at all: first, because the unbalance is not there, and second, removing the very miniscule organic surface from the bottom makes the sound duller, more like plastic...
 

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Have you checked if the reeds have become warped when that happens? Check with an even glass surface. The solution then would be balancing the reed, with Tom Ridenour’s ATG method and/or the Reed Wizard tool, for example.
The warping usually is the result of the reed achieving its real, wet balance, and should be addresses from the top of the reed, the curved side. I would not scrape and even the bottom out at all: first, because the unbalance is not there, and second, removing the very miniscule organic surface from the bottom makes the sound duller, more like plastic...
Miniscule organic surface? Removing it makes a reed sound dull like plastic...what are you talking about?
 

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When you take the reed off the mouthpiece, once it has become buzzy, is it wet in the table area? Ideally there will be moisture on the back of the reed inside the well-defined window area. If the moist area extends below the window into the table, then your reed is warping. You may also notice moisture on the table of the mouthpiece. If this is the case, the reed as absorbed moisture and warped away from the table, causing very small leaks between the window and the table (or the flat part of the rails and the outside), and you get a buzz.

The polish on paper may help (do it early in the reed's life, and before you soak it), or flattening the back may help too. Matt Stohrer did a great video on showing how the reed warps when played, and how to fix it.

Or it could just be your chops are tired. If you put your horn down for 15 minutes and then play again (not changing the reed or anything at all, just putting the mouthpiece cap on and the horn on a stand), does the buzziness go away?

To be perfectly honest I'm not sure what you mean by buzzy sound. Is it possible to record it? It might help diagnose the issue if you could record the sound before and after the buzz... (Several snarky comments with the phrase "buzz-kill" spring to mind here, but I'll avoid them...)
 

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To be perfectly honest I'm not sure what you mean by buzzy sound.
I'm not sure either. But if it's not the 'frying pan' sound resulting from an overly wet reed, it seems more likely to be a mpc issue. The Legere reeds have a more 'muffled' tone in my experience and so might work to mitigate the issue on that particular mpc.
 

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I'm not sure either. But if it's not the 'frying pan' sound resulting from an overly wet reed, it seems more likely to be a mpc issue. The Legere reeds have a more 'muffled' tone in my experience and so might work to mitigate the issue on that particular mpc.
Yeah, I thought it was the tired chops like skeller did. If it were just extra moisture at the joining of the reed and mouthpiece, why would it only happen after an hour of playing, right? OP is vague in describing the actual sound and hasn’t checked in for a while so all we can do is speculate.
 

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Hmmm...sometimes buzz is associated with the thinner rails you see in metal pieces.
 

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I always use harder reeds on Tenor (and Bari), preferably plastic, for this specific reason. On Tenor I play Vandoren V21 3.5 (S80 C*), and sometimes they are still too soft. On Soprano and Alto, on similar mouthpieces, I can rarely go above a 3.
 

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Miniscule organic surface? Removing it makes a reed sound dull like plastic...what are you talking about?
If you shave and make really even the area of the reed’s underside that is exposed to the chamber/air column, I find you remove some nice overtones/interest/maybe distortion in the sound. I would leave that surface with its miniscule, random imperfections untouched.
 

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If you shave and make really even the area of the reed’s underside that is exposed to the chamber/air column, I find you remove some nice overtones/interest/maybe distortion in the sound. I would leave that surface with its miniscule, random imperfections untouched.

Hmm...making sure the back is perfectly flat is the one thing that just about every one of the seemingly hundreds of reed prep rituals agree upon. A reed that doesn’t have a flat back won’t play for ****. It’s just cane material, no magic.
 

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Hmm...making sure the back is perfectly flat is the one thing that just about every one of the seemingly hundreds of reed prep rituals agree upon. A reed that doesn’t have a flat back won’t play for ****. It’s just cane material, no magic.
I don't think he was referring to the part that is against the table
 
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