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a) play test the horn in the shop for a good amount of time before you pay and leave. (learn how to properly play test a horn so that any issues will be discovered immediately, don't just blow showing off you ability or lack of)
b) don't pay or take the horn out of the shop until you are 110% happy.
c) all work should have a 3 month warranty.
 

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This saga isn't satisfying. First, that tech most likely thinks he's done an excellent job. For his own benefit and for the benefit of future customers, he should be aware of the issues you found. There should be a diplomatic way to do this. Otherwise, the tech will continue to botch other player's instruments and the misery will continue.

Until there is some cathartic resolution at the level of informing the tech, there's little point in telling us of his poor work and your correction of it.
Totally agree. The OP says the tech tooted a few notes but couldn't really play the sax, wrong tech dude. This hole story sounds totally bizarre. What a ridiculous story/scenario.
 

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Anyone can make a mistake. That said, checking that the palm F key is closing before it is stopped by the front F linkage arm is the most basic thing to check when adjusting the front F key.
Indeed.
If a tech does significant work on an instrument, there is potential for dozens if not hundreds of mistakes -both in things done and things that should have been done - all affecting how the instrument plays.
So it seems in this job, players really do expect workmanship to be mistake-free, and with a good technician, it typically is.

The number of things a good technician checks for while working, is enormous.
Even simple operating a key slowly while a leak light is in the instrument, is checking for a whole heap of things - leaks, obviously, but also the condition and operation in a mechanical sense of every part and material associated with the key and its tone hole. The casual observer has no idea of the extent of all these checks that attempt to eliminate "mistakes".
 

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Indeed.
If a tech does significant work on an instrument, there is potential for dozens if not hundreds of mistakes -both in things done and things that should have been done - all affecting how the instrument plays.
So it seems in this job, players really do expect workmanship to be mistake-free, and with a good technician, it typically is.

The number of things a good technician checks for while working, is enormous.
Even simple operating a key slowly while a leak light is in the instrument, is checking for a whole heap of things - leaks, obviously, but also the condition and operation in a mechanical sense of every part and material associated with the key and its tone hole. The casual observer has no idea of the extent of all these checks that attempt to eliminate "mistakes".
The one thing lost among all the finger pointing is that OP states that with a few minor adjustments, the horn now plays better than ever before. So ..... Everybody can make mistakes and everybody counts mistakes nowadays rather than achievements/accomplishments and that is where this world is going wrong. You do more work, you make more mistakes. I am not trying to defend the tech here, rather to put things back into perspective.

Otherwise we would all need to agree on: He who drinks, sleeps. He who sleeps, does not sin. He who does not sin, is holy. Therefore he who drinks, is holy.
 

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Any tech who plays well, not necessarily with blistering technique but with a good tone and control in all registers has the advantage of being able to "check his work" and make any necessary tweaks or adjustments before returning the sax to it's owner. Occasionally when a player tests the saxophone in the shop and points out something like a spring or two that don't feel stiff enough, things like that don't represent a mistake made by the tech. That is just making "fine adjustments" to fit a player's preference. Good communication at the outset of the repair or overhaul where the player lists individual preferences, and things to look for can go a long way to avoiding problems or disagreements later on.

Any customer who insists on bringing the sax back to me after an overhaul time after time with "nitpicking" things that he could have brought up when the sax was dropped off or picked up the first time would not be a customer I would want to work for again. Thankfully I have had only two that fit in this category in the past 19 years for which I am grateful.
 

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Any tech who plays well, not necessarily with blistering technique but with a good tone and control in all registers has the advantage of being able to "check his work" and make any necessary tweaks or adjustments before returning the sax to it's owner. Occasionally when a player tests the saxophone in the shop and points out something like a spring or two that don't feel stiff enough, things like that don't represent a mistake made by the tech. That is just making "fine adjustments" to fit a player's preference. Good communication at the outset of the repair or overhaul where the player lists individual preferences, and things to look for can go a long way to avoiding problems or disagreements later on.

Any customer who insists on bringing the sax back to me after an overhaul time after time with "nitpicking" things that he could have brought up when the sax was dropped off or picked up the first time would not be a customer I would want to work for again. Thankfully I have had only two that fit in this category in the past 19 years for which I am grateful.
Still two is too many.
I think that is about the same percentage for me in piano tech work.
I had to burn down their house to get rid of the piano :)
 

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Any customer who insists on bringing the sax back to me after an overhaul time after time with "nitpicking" things that he could have brought up when the sax was dropped off or picked up the first time would not be a customer I would want to work for again. Thankfully I have had only two that fit in this category in the past 19 years for which I am grateful.
I guess it depends how many times and why. Maybe they have only realized they prefer a spring to be stiffer after a few days. Maybe they also wanted a palm key to be straightened during the repair, only to decide they like the "wrong" bent position it had before better. Just a couple of examples. I don't mind it and it doesn't happen often anyway.
 
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