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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

I manage the sax department at Howarth of London. We have the first new Yanagisawa Sopranino in solid silver to high F# and I though people would want to know. It really is fantastic and a lot cheaper than the Selmer to high F# in brass.

I know there are a lot of sopranino enthusiasts on here who may be interested and we are happy for people to come and try or just see it.

I don't suppose there will be many made and I like promoting the extreme saxophone cause!

Cheers

Stuart.

http://www.howarth.uk.com/pic.aspx?pic=.%2Fwo%2Fsxyanagisawasn9930.JPG&pid=987497
 

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It looks beautiful and surely will play very nicely, thanks for the heads up! :)
 

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It does look lovely. But it seems to be a tweaked version of the existing model with its old style LH pinky and palm keys.

Rhys
 

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I don't think that they would have gone into a complete redesign but they only added to their already dated design
 

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With silver at an all time high, possibly not the best time to be making a horn in silver.
Beautiful looking saxophone.
 

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The cost of the siver would be around $600. If you look at that as $600 extra it's not that much if that's what you want. If it's much more than that , well then you are paying a remimum beyond the cost of the silver. The price was not mentioned other than less than being ripped for a Selmer.
 

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Are you judging that by cost/mass or the cost of rolling silver sheet to the correct specification?
 

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well, even silver plating cost little more than lacquer but a plated horn cost way more than a lacquered. You sell less, need more attention to make it , it can tarnish in storage or shipping........... it ends up costing more
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Hi, @rhysonsax. It does have a system which is more like the older sops. I have seen this on some modern small saxes before where they need to compress the mech to fit the very high notes in (in this case high f and f#). It all works very well. The mech is small and light and the low notes are wonderfully full. I think the roundness and extra power from the solid silver really gives this small sax extra power and body. I'm rubbish at sopranino but I enjoyed play testing tis one!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
These horns take a lot of care and attention. Yanagisawa are still one of the most handmade saxes available and since so few of these will be made with the altered key work you can really see how much attention has gone into making it play well. With the solid silver saxes the price doesn't always move in line with the price of silver since there are so few made and the manufacturers will buy silver stocks when prices are low. You tend to see high prices when silver has risen for a long time. Also for the sopranino there is the possibility of using parts of silver sheeting which are too small for the other saxes. For the eight years I have been here the solid silver saxes have had pretty much the %age increases as saxes made from any other material. Of course the problem is that a 3% increase on £400 is a lot more than a 3% increase on £4500. I really think this sopranino is at a great price.


As with the other soid silver yanagisawas I think this is solid silver which is then plated and then lacquered.

I tried the solid gold alto at the messe in Frankfurt when I was looking for new products, £35000 5 years ago and it was possibly the best sax I have ever played. drool drool!
 

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The cost of the siver would be around $600. If you look at that as $600 extra it's not that much if that's what you want. If it's much more than that , well then you are paying a remimum beyond the cost of the silver. The price was not mentioned other than less than being ripped for a Selmer.
Totally agree....but the material costs must be worked into any product...basic economics.
It so happens that silver is at an all time high, which affects the end cost...that's all I said.
One could build a Ferrari from solid gold with diamond encrusted door handles & someone would buy it...despite the fact that, in that case, the raison d'etre, the performance, would be reduced.
 

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Sure can, they are the adjectives I have chosen to use to describe the difference in the sound. I don't have the facilities to do a spectral analysis but on pretty much all the solid silver saxes I have tried I have found that they seem to have a roundness which maybe comes from the energy put into the note being spread more evenly through the harmonics. I would think that this would mean that there are fewer spikes in energy on the higher harmonics which occur in a bright sound. Vancent David uses a Solid Silver crook on his gold plated series III for chamber work because it has a fuller sound in a smaller environment ( he describes the properties really well but he ius a Selmer artist so he has had a lot of practice at describing the different properties to retailers). He uses just gold plate when doing orchestral works for projection.

I would love to know why different metals behave differenlty, but my accoustic modual in my masters didn't go that far. maybe I'll have time to study Physics when I retire! (if I get to).

@Stephen Howard. We absolutely loved your Hayes manual we got for stock. It's actually a Hayes manual... brilliant.

Stuart
 

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Sure can, they are the adjectives I have chosen to use to describe the difference in the sound. I don't have the facilities to do a spectral analysis but on pretty much all the solid silver saxes I have tried I have found that they seem to have a roundness which maybe comes from the energy put into the note being spread more evenly through the harmonics. I would think that this would mean that there are fewer spikes in energy on the higher harmonics which occur in a bright sound. Vancent David uses a Solid Silver crook on his gold plated series III for chamber work because it has a fuller sound in a smaller environment ( he describes the properties really well but he ius a Selmer artist so he has had a lot of practice at describing the different properties to retailers). He uses just gold plate when doing orchestral works for projection.

I would love to know why different metals behave differenlty, but my accoustic modual in my masters didn't go that far. maybe I'll have time to study Physics when I retire! (if I get to).
Best of luck in finding those differences - no-one else seems to have done, so far.
There's quite a lot of scientific data that's been presented through this forum - well worth a read sometime.

To Yanagisawa's credit, they seem to be the least - shall we say 'exuberant' - of manufacturers when it comes to making dubious claims. I like that - they just make great horns and leave it at that.
Mind you, I did spot one odd claim:

"Blue steel springs give the player quick response and are much more resilient than stainless steel (they also last much longer)"

@Stephen Howard. We absolutely loved your Hayes manual we got for stock. It's actually a Hayes manual... brilliant.

Stuart
Cheers, and thanks for the compliment! But - only one copy for stock?? Ya cheapskates ;)

Regards,
 

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I have seen this on some modern small saxes before where they need to compress the mech to fit the very high notes in (in this case high f and f#).
Actually more modern designs provide more (not less) room for the high tone holes as they are displaced around the radius of the bore rather than in line. The change makes for a much more consistent feel moving from other horns as well. Every other maker of Sopraninos has moved to the modern design. It's a shame Yanagisawa has not kept up in Sopranino given the wonderful ergonomics of the Yani Sopranos...
 

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I too think it's a shame they didn't redesign the palm keys and LH pinky cluster to bring them up to date as the Italian (and Chinese copies of the Italian) makers have done with their sopraninos - maybe adding a front F key as well. Maybe they will in time just as they did with their curved sopranos.
 

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Hello, I realize this thread is very old but is this horn still around. I have a great interest in it. I also sent a pm
Here is the current 'nino inventory at the OP's business: http://www.howarth.uk.com/products.aspx?id=30&filter=177

Kessler is another Yanagisawa dealer: https://www.kesslerandsons.com/sopranino-saxophones/

And USA Horn: https://www.usahorn.net/collections/vendors?q=Yanagisawa

No 9930 'ninos in sight for now. :cry: But you might contact them to learn what is on order.

G'luck!
 
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