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Hi

What type of solder should I use for soldering small parts on the saxophone?
Thanks for your help.
 

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Hi

What type of solder should I use for soldering small parts on the saxophone?
Thanks for your help.
Depending on the exact application, either braze (silver-solder) or use 94/6 tin/silver solder. We haven't used lead based solders in years. Any of the solid lead solders (50/50, 60/40, 70/30) will technically work, although it's not environmentally friendly and is not as strong. Work in a well ventilated area. Be careful of breathing silver solder fumes as it contains cadmium which is a carcinogen, as well as the flux fumes whicih will burn your eyes and nose. You will need the appropriate flux depending on the type of solder work you are doing.
 

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"Be careful of breathing lead solder fumes... "
Typo? I think you mean "Be careful of breathing silver-solder fumes "

But best not to breathe lead fumes either.
 

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Yes indeed Gordon. Edit done. Thanks for picking up on that error. And you are correct about being cautious of both types.
I use to watch the "oldtimers" in Elkhart solder with lead solder...I was in my 20's and they were 50-60...seems pretty young now. The method they used was: Hold torch in one hand, hold the spool of solder in the other and use your teeth to pull off the required amount for soldering. I gave up commenting on how bad this was for your health when they told me all they were doing was pulling on it with their teeth, they were'nt sucking on it. Wonder how many are still around, I lost track.

FYI, the solder flux that EB use to sell had heavy metals disolved (it was zink or lead...don't remember for sure) in the acid. I would imagine that your original caution was correct for the wrong reason. I don't think the lead solder fumes are too healthy for you either.
 

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Agreed. Breathing fumes from either is not recommended. That's why I mentioned working in a properly vented/exhausted location. I don't miss those old days of using glycerin/hydrochloric(?) acid flux either. ;-)

Another very important factor that has not been mentioned here; Always use safety glasses!!
 

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That one says "Not for home use".


PROFESSIONAL USE ONLY*


DESIGNED FOR THE PROFESSIONAL TOOL INDUSTRIES
The BLAZER line of butane torches is strictly intended for use in the professional and industrial hand tool industries. Our wide range of torches are currently used by many industry specific professionals including:
Automotive Repair Technicians
Dental/Medical Labs Technician
Electricians
Plumbers
Carpenters
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...DESIGNED FOR PROFESSIONAL APPLICATIONS
The BLAZER Torches have a broad range of professional and industrial applications including:
Soldering
Sterilization
Fusing adhesives/activating caulking
Heat shrink tubing
Wire Annealing
Optical frame repair
Lapidary
Jewelry and precious metal work
Bond, alter or bend ceramics, metals and glass
Woodworking
Outdoor Repair Work
Lossening, thawing nuts and bolts
Laying Tile
HVAC
...and many more!
The Blazer Products Line of hand held butane refillable Torches is available wherever Professional and Industrial tools and equipment supplies are sold. To find one in your area e-mail us today!

*Blazer Products Butane Torches are not intended for home use. To see our new line of Home Use Tools Click Here.


I work at home. LOL:):D:TGNCHK:
 

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The Blazer is safer than a tank of gas, for sure. If you've ever had a water pipe burst in your house in the dead of winter when it's -20 outside and the break is in a tight space or surrounded by insulation, you'll wish you had a Blazer at home like I do. I've saved several friends with it also. The Blazer has a much finer flame tip with better control, higher heat, it's smaller, lighter and less cumbersome. Much safer also, since it goes out instantly when you release the trigger, unless the bernzo owner has the expensive electronic starter in leiu of the typical on/off dial, which requires an external spark source such as a striker, matches, or cigarette lighter for ignition. I have ordered them for many friends and family members and everyone I know says the smoke any other torch for doing household plumbing. Even plumbers agree that for teh average job, they rule! The only slight down fall is time between butane refills. (10 secs.)

Sure it CAN be done with a Bernzo. But even with decades of repair experience I don't think I could do a confident, quality and neat job soldering (especially in confined areas with lots of lead soldered posta and parts to fall off when overheated, due to close proximity) using a generic Bernzo rig.
 

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I don't think I would succeed in getting sufficient heat for sliver-soldering copper pipe using a Blazer. The copper conducts the heat away far too fast.

But for instrument repair, Blazer is a great, handy tool.
 

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I don't think I would succeed in getting sufficient heat for sliver-soldering copper pipe using a Blazer. The copper conducts the heat away far too fast.

But for instrument repair, Blazer is a great, handy tool.
But, you don't use silver-solder for sweating in copper household water pipes. Even using soft-solders, you have to empty the copper pipe(s) of pressurized water.
 

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I found a great little torch at Home Depot . It is a little bigger than a Blazer and it is made by Ronsen . It cost 29 dollars. Cant get the flame real small but it will work and it large enough to silver solder small parts. Never saw it there before so I think it is a new item. Check it out. It looks like a overgrown Blazer torch. It is red.
 

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I don't think I would succeed in getting sufficient heat for sliver-soldering copper pipe using a Blazer. The copper conducts the heat away far too fast.

But for instrument repair, Blazer is a great, handy tool.
But, you don't use silver-solder for sweating in copper household water pipes. Even using soft-solders, you have to empty the copper pipe(s) of pressurized water.
Hmm. I've used it. I copied a plumber. Especially for joining 2 copper pipes. Expand with a crox tool, cut through, at the centre of the expansion, insert the 2nd pipe, and silver-solder. Also for making a T-joint, or any other more unusal connection.
 

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FYI, the solder flux that EB use to sell had heavy metals disolved (it was zink or lead...don't remember for sure) in the acid. I would imagine that your original caution was correct for the wrong reason. I don't think the lead solder fumes are too healthy for you either.
Probably zinc chloride flux which is made by dissolving zinc in hydrochloric acid until saturated. I have a bottle of such flux, works very well, but must be handled with care and cleaned off after soldering as it's corrosive. The fumes are quite noxious too.
 

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I don't think I would succeed in getting sufficient heat for sliver-soldering copper pipe using a Blazer. The copper conducts the heat away far too fast.

But for instrument repair, Blazer is a great, handy tool.
But, you don't use silver-solder for sweating in copper household water pipes. Even using soft-solders, you have to empty the copper pipe(s) of pressurized water.
Hmm. I've used it. I copied a plumber. Especially for joining 2 copper pipes. Expand with a crox tool, cut through, at the centre of the expansion, insert the 2nd pipe, and silver-solder. Also for making a T-joint, or any other more unusal connection.
I use soft solder and prefabbed copper pieces for all that. It's certainly strong enough, very easy, and very quick. I'm not sure how unusual it would have to get to have to make pieces not in a common hardware store's inventory...
 
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