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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi. I was wondering if there is a way to solder wire or something to standard tone holes to make them similar to rolled tone holes.
Thanks.
 

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Hi 1844sax and welcome to SOTW!

All rolled tone holes do is provide extra rigidity to the tone hole stacks. They add uniqueness and maybe a mark of quality to saxes that came with them originally from the factory. But adding them to horn that did not come with them really gives you nothing and it would be very difficult do anyway.

I recently had a very good technician and fabricator experiment with repairing some damaged rolled tone holes on a 1937 Conn. Fabrication was easy. Soldering turned out to be very time consuming to get exactly the right height and the smooth finish on the inside. It also did nothing for the damaged tone hole stacks that I had. For my Conn, we decided to replace all the tone hole stacks (some previously damaged) with new billet machined stacks to be soldered directly to the body tube. This is the way Martin and a few early Conn saxophones were made from the factory. The new soldiered tone holes allow for perfect roundness, correct height and size. And even this process, is taking a very long time and could be an expensive undertaking.

Tell us more about yourself and your saxophone and maybe we can give you more specific suggestions about where you might want to go with your playing and equipment.
 

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And even this process, is taking a very long time and could be an expensive undertaking.
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Holy Cow! I'd like to see pictures of that in various stages, if you have any. Sounds like an awesome project, and not one that would get tackled very often because of the prohibitive time (and therefore cost) requirements.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the reply guys, It does sound like it would be too much of a tideous and exacting job.
 

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And even this process, is taking a very long time and could be an expensive undertaking.
.

Holy Cow! I'd like to see pictures of that in various stages, if you have any. Sounds like an awesome project, and not one that would get tackled very often because of the prohibitive time (and therefore cost) requirements.
While tedious, I can imagine exactly how to machine replacement stacks and can imagine removing one or two toneholes by hand (i.e. foredom/dremel), but I have to ask "How are you going to get the old stacks off?

I recently overhauled a high-end handmade horn that had some factory repairs where the stack sidewalls were too thin 'as drawn' and the factory had made a 'sleeve' for them and ground the whole thing (almost) flat to make a nice seat for the pad. Did you consider just sleeving the existing holes? It would reduce the tonehole size by .040"-.050" but much less work presumably.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2007-
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While tedious, I can imagine exactly how to machine replacement stacks and can imagine removing one or two toneholes by hand (i.e. foredom/dremel), but I have to ask "How are you going to get the old stacks off?

I recently overhauled a high-end handmade horn that had some factory repairs where the stack sidewalls were too thin 'as drawn' and the factory had made a 'sleeve' for them and ground the whole thing (almost) flat to make a nice seat for the pad. Did you consider just sleeving the existing holes? It would reduce the tonehole size by .040"-.050" but much less work presumably.
This work is light-years beyond anything I could ever do. Lance Burton at MartinMods came up with this plan and I've left it all in his hands to precede as he sees best. He's sent some photos of the machining and on-going work. And it's purely amazing. He is even engraving an image of my wife on the bell. The man is a true master.
 
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