Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 20 of 39 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,458 Posts
Yep, that happens sometimes. Take it to a repair guy who will re-solder it in about 10 minutes. You've also got a loose screw in the octave mechanism. You probably ought to get a set of little screwdrivers and go over the whole horn and make sure all the screws are tight.

Is your mouthpiece too tight on the cork, so you have to struggle to get it on?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
thanks turf3 this ring it was on the saxophone and going out and the mouthpiece is not too tight on the cork,I wish it did not happening great damage over there...i will go to repair gay to re-solder
 

·
Distinguished Technician & SOTW Columnist. RIP, Yo
Joined
·
17,204 Posts
I don't think any screw is loose. The rod that you can see is only visible because the post is removed along with the tenon socket.
I agree with Turf3... a straight-forward, quick job.
Depending on the lacquer that has been used, you mkay get some darkening of destruction of the lacquer in the vicinity, from the soldering heat.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
3,925 Posts
Re: Solder lost it from the top ring of my Yany S880

looks very bad..
Το μέρος δεν είναι κατεστραμμένο. Έχει μόλις έρθει χαλαρά. Όπως Turf3 λέει, μικρή εργασία

Φροντίστε να πάρετε στο λαιμό με να δοκιμάσετε το fit.


^says
The part is not damaged. It has just come loose. Like Turf3 says, small job
Make sure to take the neck with you to test the fit.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
3,925 Posts
I don't think any screw is loose. The rod that you can see is only visible because the post is removed along with the tenon socket.
I agree with Turf3... a straight-forward, quick job.
Depending on the lacquer that has been used, you mkay get some darkening of destruction of the lacquer in the vicinity, from the soldering heat.
Translation to Greek^
Δεν νομίζω ότι κάθε βίδα είναι χαλαρό. Η ράβδος που μπορείτε να δείτε είναι ορατό μόνο επειδή η δημοσίευση αφαιρείται μαζί με την υποδοχή tenon. Συμφωνώ με Turf3... μια απλή, γρήγορη δουλειά. Ανάλογα με το βερνίκι που έχει χρησιμοποιηθεί, mkay εσείς λάβετε κάποια σκουρόχρωμα καταστροφής της Λάκκας στην περιοχή, από τη συγκόλληση θερμότητα.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I don't think any screw is loose. The rod that you can see is only visible because the post is removed along with the tenon socket.
I agree with Turf3... a straight-forward, quick job.
Depending on the lacquer that has been used, you mkay get some darkening of destruction of the lacquer in the vicinity, from the soldering heat.
thanks Gordon (NZ) it is without lacquer all the sax so I have no problem with the color ,i will try to to be there when he repairs it ,so that he can do a quick job with the heat I do not want the metal to be destroyed in this area I have heard a lot of bad repair stories....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Re: Solder lost it from the top ring of my Yany S880

Το μέρος δεν είναι κατεστραμμένο. Έχει μόλις έρθει χαλαρά. Όπως Turf3 λέει, μικρή εργασία

Φροντίστε να πάρετε στο λαιμό με να δοκιμάσετε το fit.


^says
The part is not damaged. It has just come loose. Like Turf3 says, small job
Make sure to take the neck with you to test the fit.
thanks PigSquealer yes i will doing I have to be there when it fixes it with heat to be sure it will be fast.it is important the amount of heat should be the fire;I need to know what kind Solder must be used?I know it's a sensitive and important area for saxophone..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,458 Posts
I don't think any screw is loose. The rod that you can see is only visible because the post is removed along with the tenon socket.
.
OK, now I see it. You're right.

I had this exact thing happen once on a gig with my tenor. I stuck it back on there, wrapped it with duct tape, and played through to the end, very carefully. (Next day it got repaired, of course.)
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
3,925 Posts
Re: Solder lost it from the top ring of my Yany S880

thanks PigSquealer yes i will doing I have to be there when it fixes it with heat to be sure it will be fast.it is important the amount of heat should be the fire;I need to know what kind Solder must be used?I know it's a sensitive and important area for saxophone..
This may help.https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?345506-Hardsoldering-question

Your repair technician will have the required “Hard Solder wire “ for proper strong joining. Should contain good amount of silver(25%+)no lead or cadmium.
Τεχνικός επισκευής σας θα έχουν το απαιτούμενο σκληρό κολλήσεις σύρμα για τη σωστή ισχυρή συμμετοχή. Θα πρέπει να περιέχουν καλή ποσότητα αργύρου δεν περιέχουν μόλυβδο ή κάδμιο
Πώς είναι αυτό το μεταφραστή;

Correction I have made a mistake with the information. Use a soft solder. See below.
Διόρθωση έχω κάνει ένα λάθος με τις πληροφορίες. Χρησιμοποιήστε μια μαλακή κόλληση
 

·
Distinguished SOTW member, musician, technician &
Joined
·
4,982 Posts
Re: Solder lost it from the top ring of my Yany S880

Your repair technician will have the required “Hard Solder wire “ for proper strong joining. Should contain good amount of silver(25%+)no lead or cadmium.
That joint is not soldered with hard silver solder (aka braze). It is either traditional tin/lead solder or a soft tin/silver leadless solder. The latter is what some companies use now, but not all.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
3,925 Posts
Re: Solder lost it from the top ring of my Yany S880

That joint is not soldered with hard silver solder (aka braze). It is either traditional tin/lead solder or a soft tin/silver leadless solder. The latter is what some companies use now, but not all.
But wouldn’t that be the reason it came apart? To soft of a joint ? Not much overlap from what I see in picture.
Also there is also post & pinch clamp attached to it. So in that regard yes I agree. Will be interesting to here back on what the tech actually uses.

Hxoshox for technician to review
Soft solder
https://musicmedic.com/stay-brite-solder.html
Hard solder 3 different heats
https://musicmedic.com/silver-solder-wire.html
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
3,925 Posts
Depending on the lacquer that has been used, you mkay get some darkening of destruction of the lacquer in the vicinity, from the soldering heat.
Gordon what’s you call on hard or soft solder. Like clarnibass mentioned i may be in left field on this one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,458 Posts
Gordon what’s you call on hard or soft solder. Like clarnibass mentioned i may be in left field on this one.
I'm not Gordon but soft solder is the right choice for that joint. "Hard" (actually means higher solidus and liquidus) is for keywork and the like where you want to be able to soft solder near it without having everything come loose. Example would be the base of a post to the post itself, which you solder with a high temp. material so you can then solder the base to the tube of the sax with low temp. material and the base won't come loose from the post.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
3,925 Posts
I'm not Gordon but soft solder is the right choice for that joint. "Hard" (actually means higher solidus and liquidus) is for keywork and the like where you want to be able to soft solder near it without having everything come loose. Example would be the base of a post to the post itself, which you solder with a high temp. material so you can then solder the base to the tube of the sax with low temp. material and the base won't come loose from the post.
I’ve made corrections to post #12 & 14. I understand the lower temperature less risk. But it also failed once. Could be just bad luck.
 

·
Distinguished Technician & SOTW Columnist. RIP, Yo
Joined
·
17,204 Posts
This joint is never done with "hard" solder. It is as Clarnibass wrote. (And Turf3)
If it came apart it is because it was poorly soldered in the first place. This is quite common, especially for some reason, Taiwanese instruments.

The tin/silver solder - approx 5% silver - is used increasingly these days, mainly for flutes I think, because of the toxicity of lead, which is hardly of concern in this location, providing the technician does not repeatedly breath in hot vapours.
Tin/silver remains brighter - less inclined to tarnish - which is hardly an issue here, and is about twice as strong as lead solder. But its melting point is somewhat higher, i.e. 221C for 96/4 for tin/silver compared with around 165C for 63/37 tin/lead solder. This extra heat is likely to melt any neighbouring tin/lead-soldered parts, so quite a risk. (And of course, far more likely to wreck lacquer.)

Other alloys of tin/lead and tin/silver may need to be heated significantly higher to become liquid enough.

"Hard soldering", sometimes called silver-soldering, or more accurately, "silver-brazing" needs more like 630C, i.e. the metal is red hot. That is used for constructing keys and attaching posts to ribs.

Unless the technician hasn't a clue what he is doing, leave these decisions up to him - don't interfere! If he hasn't a clue, don't go near him!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
This joint is never done with "hard" solder. It is as Clarnibass wrote. (And Turf3)
If it came apart it is because it was poorly soldered in the first place. This is quite common, especially for some reason, Taiwanese instruments.

The tin/silver solder - approx 5% silver - is used increasingly these days, mainly for flutes I think, because of the toxicity of lead, which is hardly of concern in this location, providing the technician does not repeatedly breath in hot vapours.
Tin/silver remains brighter - less inclined to tarnish - which is hardly an issue here, and is about twice as strong as lead solder. But its melting point is somewhat higher, i.e. 221C for 96/4 for tin/silver compared with around 165C for 63/37 tin/lead solder. This extra heat is likely to melt any neighbouring tin/lead-soldered parts, so quite a risk. (And of course, far more likely to wreck lacquer.)

Other alloys of tin/lead and tin/silver may need to be heated significantly higher to become liquid enough.

"Hard soldering", sometimes called silver-soldering, or more accurately, "silver-brazing" needs more like 630C, i.e. the metal is red hot. That is used for constructing keys and attaching posts to ribs.

Unless the technician hasn't a clue what he is doing, leave these decisions up to him - don't interfere! If he hasn't a clue, don't go near him!
Gordon (NZ) thank you very useful information especially for here we do not have many technicians...and it is a big risk that you do not know what a repairer is supposed to do...I have a question if the metal was heated more above the saxophone harmonics sounds are destroyed in this area of the sax ?what could be done if work is not done properly...thanks
 
1 - 20 of 39 Posts
Top