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Discussion Starter #1
This being flute-specific, thought I'd post here ........

I'm looking for some regulation screws for an old SML flute. I'm assuming they're metric but my metric pitch gauge only goes down to .35, which apparently isn't small enough.

Anyone know what pitch SML used for these back in the day?
 

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WOW, you got me on this one! The smallest screws that I have found are the set screws for Conn Flutes and Saxes but I think they are not metric. Yamaha uses fairly small adjustment screws so perhaps one of those might be correct.
 

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Bruce, you seem to be thinking diameter rather than pitch. :)

Conn set screws are threaded 1-64 UNC. 64 tpi is close to a metric pitch of 0.4 mm (actually 0.397 mm), so this is far too coarse, and these screws are far too short to be regulating screws.

Yamaha regulating screws are 2 x .4 mm, so the pitch is far too great.

Hornimus, It sounds as if you may need to access a more comprehensive pitch gauge. But you may get a little help if you have an American pitch gauge that goes to 80 tpi. 80 tpi is very close to 0.3 mm pitch. (actually 0.318 mm)

For what it is worth, Grassi flute regulating screws are 2 x .25 mm. If it is indeed 2 x.25 mm, and Grassi is a last resort, I can't be the closest technician who has some of these in stock.

You could just re-thread it to take a Yamaha regulating screw.

I have seen a few SML flutes, but not one that was worth restoring. Clarinets were a lot better IMO.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks Gordon. The SML screws do appear to be around .30 mm pitch as the threads match up rather well in an 80 tpi gauge.

I think I may follow your advice and re-tap to have the Yamaha screws fit.

Curious, were the SML flutes you've worked on all French-made? This one I'm dealing with is a Paris horn, with the soldered-on, bevel-rim toneholes you only see these days on high-end handmade flutes. Probably plated brass.
 

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hornimus said:
...Curious, were the SML flutes you've worked on all French-made? This one I'm dealing with is a Paris horn, with the soldered-on, bevel-rim toneholes you only see these days on high-end handmade flutes. Probably plated brass.
Yes, that's the description. From memory , those tone holes are soldered on with lead solder. Prone to galvanic corrosion hence leaks over time.
From memory, there was also lead solder where there needs to be silver solder (for strength, hence stability of adjustment) in the key work... what you would expect only in a low grade Chinese flute now. (However my memory COULD have confused with another obsolete brand - I've worked on over 130 brands of flute so the memory may be unreliable.)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Gordon said:
Yes, that's the description. From memory , those tone holes are soldered on with lead solder. Prone to galvanic corrosion hence leaks over time.
I thought all flutes with soldered tonehole chimneys used soft or lead solder for that.....
 

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I'm not sure myself about that, but at least one maker, Stephen Wessel, uses silver solder. See the very end of
http://72.14.253.104/search?q=cache...+hole+silver+solder&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=66&gl=nz

If there is silver plating, or sterling silver present, and lead/tin (or silver-solder - not quite so bad) they are well apart in electrode potential charts, so the solder will be sacrificed if electrolytes (saliva, perspiration, salt air, etc) have access to both the plating and the solder.

I've seen that on old flutes and saxes, and metal clarinets. Quite a case against lead soldered tone holes, IMO.

Ref: http://www.pemnet.com/design_info/galvanic.html
 

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Gordon (NZ) said:
( I've worked on over 130 brands of flute so the memory may be unreliable.)
Then perhaps you may have the answer for a project flute I'm working on.
The pad screws on a Conservarte, as in; it came to me missing a few.
Any suggestions on where to locate suitable replacements?


thanks,
mark
 

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Never heard of it. So I have no idea.

However there is only a very small range of threads used on pad screws. And several of them are effectively interchangeable - metric with US threads.

I would look through a technician's pad screw stock for ones that look suitable. Chances are they will fit. If too large, or they jam, rethread them to match the threads on the existing screws. Too small, try others.
 

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Gordon (NZ) said:
Never heard of it. So I have no idea.

However there is only a very small range of threads used on pad screws. And several of them are effectively interchangeable - metric with US threads.

I would look through a technician's pad screw stock for ones that look suitable. Chances are they will fit. If too large, or they jam, rethread them to match the threads on the existing screws. Too small, try others.
Thank you, I will see what I can find. They made a good flute, whoever they
were, which is why I grabbed this one when I saw it. If it plays like the one
I got from my father, it will be a nice back up. :)


mark
 
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