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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello!

Yesterday I spent some time examining my Trevor James Horn Classic and found what appeared to me as a small leak. There is a small tone hole near the top B perl key that is operated by a short rod that is depressed by either the B1 or G1 perl keys or both when fingering one of these notes (A1 as well).
I noticed that when I press those keys with normal force the small tone hole does not close completely, I can see a tiny chink between the pad and the 'chimney' on one side of the pad. When I apply brute force to the keys it apparently closes but I would not normally do that when playing the sax.

I am a beginner and I wonder if that could affect my sound in any way. I wrote in another forum branch that I am currently struggling with producing the high notes using octave key.
It is interesting to see that the method used to close this small tone hole (I haven't closely examined other similar keys and pads) is what I would call "analog". The short rod that I mentioned above is depressed by two concave levers through the cork pads so that the pad may be pressed against the chimney more or less tightly depending of the cork pads' thikness and wear.
 

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I found that sat least in my area, this is a common problem on many saxophones (including expensive ones!). There are a few things that can cause it and you need to look at the sax to know which one. If it is a leak you can see even without a leak light then it is probably a bad one and will almost definitely affect your sound. The sax might also have other leaks that you can't see. If you have a good and trustworthy repairer in your area that's where I would go.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Oh, yes, from what I see the thicker cork pads would definitely seal the leakage. Actually I've always considered myself a DIY man but this time I've called a tech and going to see him today. I feel that sax is a very fine thing to let some surprises be hidden. Too much frustration for a beginner to overcome.
 

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WinnSie said:
... Actually I've always considered myself a DIY man but this time I've called a tech and going to see him today. ...
My tech says they just love it when somebody tells them they are going to fix their horn or start fixing horns.

I also consider myself a DIYer and I even bought an old Vito alto to try a repad. After reading this forum I quickly decided that for the cost of getting the materials and the potential anguish it really wasn't worth the bother. My time is better spent trying to improve my sax playing.

Knowing a few of the common adjustments is worthwhile and this forum is a great resource to be able to determine whether or not it a tweak or a repair is required.

Others are welcome to have a different perspective!
 

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Not for the DYI

I too echo Bennyg's sentiment.

I'm a DYI'er, I'm also an engineer. I bought a used, abused, black-with-corrosion saxophone to clean up and turn into a lamp. I took this thing apart to clean and rebuild it and learned a lot along the way.

For one thing, one adjustment in one area usually affects an adjustment in at least one other area. There is usually a balancing act that has to go on when adjusting key heights, etc.

The second and probably more important thing is that this is a skill that is learned and practiced. Seating pads, fitting corks and felts, fixing solder joints, swedging keys, and so on. All of these things take skill and (from my own experience with my lamp) you can tell when someone works on a horn who doesn't know what they're doing (like me!). They'll usually do more damage than good.

Simple adjustments: gluing a cork back in where it fell out, removing a key that needs oil or has become sticky; these are fine for a DIY'er. I leave everything else to a tech.
 

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vermontsax said:
I bought a used, abused, black-with-corrosion saxophone to clean up and turn into a lamp. I took this thing apart to clean and rebuild it and learned a lot along the way...
So you play on a lamp now? Make sure the cord is long enough when you are on stage! :D
 

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I've got no strings ...

No need for a cord. Just a nine-volt battery.

LED lights, a built-in sequencer, built-in Yamaha WX tone machine, wireless output ... I wouldn't even need to show up! :D

Rock on!
 
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