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Forum Contributor 2015, SOTW Better late than neve
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Discussion Starter #1
My Conn 6M pictured in my avatar is starting to have an issue with the responce of the G# key. Actually the keytouch works fine. It's the keycup that is slow to lift off the the tone hole. It's not sticking. Just slow to move or only lifts halfway. I assume it needs a spring replacement, but the mechanics in the area is very tight and I can't tell what's going on (or not) there.

Is this an easy DIY fix or is tech visit in my future?

Please help :help:
 

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tjontheroad said:
Is this an easy DIY fix or is tech visit in my future?
Maybe and maybe. Depends on the cause of the sluggishness.
 

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It could very well be gunk that has settled in the pivot screw pockets or key rod/tubes of the parts in question.

Does this problem go away temporarily when you oil these areas? If so, that may be the source rather than the springs or spring tension.

Did your horn take any knocks in that area recently? A bent rod or kink in the rod/tube, or a key rod post that has moved off center could cause an issue such as this too.
 

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Hmmmm... if it wasn't happening before, and was a gradual thing, it could be what saxismyaxe mentioned. To me, it kind of sounds like the rod is bent and has been for sometime. The rod could be slightly bent, but turned in such a way that the key was working fine. So as you have been playing the horn, over time, the rod was rotating (because it’s bent) and now eventually worked its way around to a place where the key will work very slowly. Again, a tech would have to look at it to know for sure. BUT since your local guys are tied up you can definitely grab a screw driver yourself and turn the rod this way and that to see if it frees anything up. If it does, just note the position of the rod using the head (3 o'clock 4 o'clock, whatever) and just check every once in awhile to make sure it's there. This could be a quick temp. fix until you get they horn to a guy so he can take the rod out and straighten it. Again, I don't know for sure if this will work in your situation, but its worth a try, and won't really hurt anything.
 

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Forum Contributor 2015, SOTW Better late than neve
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Discussion Starter #5
saxismyaxe said:
It could very well be gunk that has settled in the pivot screw pockets or key rod/tubes of the parts in question.

Does this problem go away temporarily when you oil these areas? If so, that may be the source rather than the springs or spring tension.

Did your horn take any knocks in that area recently? A bent rod or kink in the rod/tube, or a key rod post that has moved off center could cause an issue such as this too.
It could use a good oiling. I've been so busy playing lately. I've slacked on daily care. That might just do the trick. I don't think it's any damage.
 

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If you are comfortable with it, disassemble it (the G# key), clean the rod, apply a light application of appropriate lube (not WD40) and reassemble. Probably wouldn't hurt anything, but I've seen people do amazing things unintentionally.
 

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Carl H. said:
If you are comfortable with it, disassemble it (the G# key), clean the rod, apply a light application of appropriate lube (not WD40) and reassemble. Probably wouldn't hurt anything, but I've seen people do amazing things unintentionally.
I agree. If it is indeed gunk build up, even if you oil it and it solves the problem temporarily, without cleaning this abrasive material out of the pivot screws/key rods it will wear away at the internal workings of these parts. That isn't a good thing.

Thoroughly cleaning the disassembled parts, and then oiling them before reassembling will insure everything is in tip top shape and function.
 

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Diagnosis:

Disconnect the spring on the G# key, so that it does not contact the key in any way.

Press down the G# lever.

Check whether the G# key moves completely freely, i.e fast operation under gravity alone.

If not:
You have a problem with excess friction associated with the hinging system. Remove the key, and check whether the rod is completely free in the tube.

If so:

Check that there is sufficient space between the posts for the key to fit easily. Also put the hinge rod alone through the unthreaded post and ensure that it lines up accurately with the threaded post. Also check that the rod screws in easily into the threaded post; otherwise suspect that this post is out of alignment, twisted, and when the rod is screwed in tight, the rod may become distorted.​

If not:

Clean tube and rod of oil/grease/muck/varnish/rust, and then check whether the rod is completely free in the tube, i.e it falls through under gravity.

If not:

Straighten parts appropriately.​

 

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Forum Contributor 2015, SOTW Better late than neve
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Discussion Starter #10
Well I just oiled up the entire horn with a bit additional attention the offending area. Definitely an improvement :thumbrig:

I'll let it sit for a day or so and see if that's as far as I need to go. Else, I'll review Gordon's checklist. I'm hoping I don't need to leave it with the repair shop. My SDA needs a pad fix too (low Bb fell out) and I need an alto working for the next two months that are full of dates.

Thanks all
 
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