Sax on the Web Forum banner
21 - 39 of 39 Posts

·
Distinguished SOTW member/, Official SOTW Sister
Joined
·
19,654 Posts
There are so many different 'brands' and forms of liquid band aids. Spray on, paint on. drops...
Be careful and read the directions on the box. Some contain ingredients that should not be ingested.
But I think if you are careful you might be ok!
Good luck in finding a suitable soulution.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
Re : Re: Skin reaction to cane, anyone else have this?

warpx, did you give Plasticovers a try? Maybe (even if some of the cover tends to flake off after a certain amount of playing) they can give you what you want without getting in contact (or too much contact after some flaking off) with the cane itself. And you do not have to soak them.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
1,596 Posts
I had the same problem a couple years back. but for me I found out it wasn't a reaction, it was the cane being too rough and ended up basically rubbing against my lips and causing it to get blistered. I eventually did the Joe Allard thing with white paper and it smoothed out the surface, and the blistering stopped .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
Something just came to my mind...maybe the Forestone reeds are what you are looking for. I personally did not try them - not knowing if the cane core breaks up nearly as fast as a normal cane reed but paying way much more for it - but eventually this might solve your problems (if they sound right by the added cane core). If you are in bad luck this might be just one more, unfortunately expensive, unmatching experience.
But maybe this it the clou....who knows ;)
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2009
Joined
·
7,939 Posts
Discussion Starter · #28 ·
I use Légères on tenor and regular clarinet, and I'm very happy with them. But I really think cane reeds sound better on bass. Just a richer tone with more core to it. For some reason the plastics seem to flatten to tone of the bass clarinet. I have not tried those Forestone reeds, I understand they are a sort of hybrid. Anyone tried them? Thanks for the suggestion.

Yeah we play in Perigeux next week, looking forward to that. It's been a while since I played in France.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
Joined
·
41,893 Posts
despite their claim to the contrary the forestone reeds is not a hybrid and even if they say that more than 50% is bamboo ( in which form , powdered bamboo in the resin or the resin being derived by some bamboo ?) there is nothing in the reed feel that has anything to make it feel any different from any synthetic reed indeed. The reed they resemble the closest, aside from the colour which might be the most important contribution of the bamboo here, is the legere.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2009
Joined
·
7,939 Posts
Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Thanks for that info. I take it you've tried them?
Sadly they don't make a bass clarinet reed. I'll send them an email asking if they're planning to make one.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
Joined
·
41,893 Posts
I have one for tenor and one for alto, they are ok but I think they are a bit too narrow to fit my ponzol(s), they sound a little buzzier than legere which I prefer.
I have them in my artificial reed panoply and I don't really used them unless I have to. I find they perform better on ebonite reeds than on metal as the easily get buzzier. Like legeres, they are very forgiving with mouthpieces which tend to squeak because they probably take the shape of the table better than cane.
In general terms I think they are very good competitors of legere although I find that for example the strength is difficult to determine since the 3 on tenor is weaker than cane and the 2,5 on alto is harder than cane.

I think that you could use a tenorsax one on bassclarinet.
 

·
Über Geek, Forum Contributor 2010 Distinguished SO
Joined
·
3,841 Posts
What a drag. I use synthetics on B.C. in doubling situations, but lately I've done more classical playing, and I also prefer the Vandoren reeds for that. You probably want to speak with your doctor and ask whether this might respond to treatment. If not, you may well have to go back to a synthetic. If that's the case, see if you can get a couple of whatever is available (and if you ask here on the forum, probably some folks would send you some of whatever we have lying around--I know I would), and just try stuff out. I've discovered that synthetic reeds lend themselves to weird combos...the best contra-alto reed I've found yet is a Legere bari sax reed. Wouldn't have figured that out if a friend hadn't given me a couple that didn't work for him.

Meanwhile, though, I've experimented with Plasticover reeds on BC, and I found they work well with a Vandy B46 I have. Maybe they'll work for you, too, but they ARE cane reeds, and if there's any chance your problem is made with with repeated exposure, you should probably check with your doctor before trying cane of any type.

Good luck, and I hope you find a solution that you can play your best on.
 
21 - 39 of 39 Posts
Top