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Sorry no quick answer possible.
This thing about warm and cold air is nonsense, the terminology is simply wrong. The reed vibrates because of the airstream that you blow into the mpc. Depending on your set up (mpc and reed) you will need more or less airpressure to get the reed vibrating. The main place you control how much pressure you generate is your lung and the inner abdominal muscles. Some use the words warm and cold to desrcibe different levels of airpressure: warm if you use less pressure like when you aspirate, cold when you use more pressure like when you blow up a balloon or a hot water bottle :mrgreen:.
How much air you use really depends on you, your soundideal and mainly your set up.
If you use a small tip opening with a soft reed you will need less airpressure than with an open tip and a harder reed.
 

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Assuming the human body temperature averages around 98.5 degrees F, breath temperature is dependent on these variables:

1. Ambient air temperature.

2. Resident time that air stays in the lungs where it warms

3. Gas exchange rate (O2 in, CO2 out)

4. Rapid expansion through the mouthpiece

5. Evaporative cooling

For argument's sake, lets hold item 1 constant for indoor air.
Item 3 is fairly constant for humans living at the same sea level in the same level of health.
Item 4 is mostly determined by the mouthpiece/reed but air speed and pressure plays a role.
Item 5 will tend toward an equilibrium if blowing in a tube, though the other factors impact evaporation.

So, item 2 is the one you can impact the most. Filling your lungs and taking deep breaths should impact breath temperature substantially since the air will spend more time in the lungs where it warms. Also, the warmer air will tend to change the moisture equilibrium of item 5. Speed likely plays less of an effect than these. And the others can be assumed as usually constant within a narrow range.

When you consider that deep breathing is required for other proper aspects of sax playing, the warmer air option is the right answer. A side benefit may be less spit collecting in your horn.

Now, do I get a cookie or what? :bluewink:
 

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What exactly is meant by this question? In my opinion; you breath in air, and the air that comes out is warmed by the lungs and nasal cavity (I have just been studying biology for an exam). In my knowledge; you use the air that is around you, you inhale it, and then the (warm) air that comes out is blown through the saxophone.
I think I am miss-understanding the question, but look at Enviroguy's post; he seems to know what he's talking about!
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YAMAHA JUNKIE
 

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Just use the air that you've got.
 

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What exactly is meant by this question? In my opinion; you breath in air, and the air that comes out is warmed by the lungs and nasal cavity (I have just been studying biology for an exam). In my knowledge; you use the air that is around you, you inhale it, and then the (warm) air that comes out is blown through the saxophone.
Here's what I think he's talking about: Hold your hand up in front of your mouth. Now blow on it like you're trying to fog up a window. That's "warm air." Now purse your lips and blow on your hand like you're trying to start a fire from burning embers or you're trying to move a small dust bunny across a plate. That's "cool air."

To the OP, I think you should think about putting "warm air" into your horn. That's the sensation you get when you really push air from your diaphragm, and that's a good way to really fill up your horn with air for a nice, full, and rich tone.
 

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Here's what I think he's talking about: Hold your hand up in front of your mouth. Now blow on it like you're trying to fog up a window. That's "warm air." Now purse your lips and blow on your hand like you're trying to start a fire from burning embers or you're trying to move a small dust bunny across a plate. That's "cool air."

To the OP, I think you should think about putting "warm air" into your horn. That's the sensation you get when you really push air from your diaphragm, and that's a good way to really fill up your horn with air for a nice, full, and rich tone.
I have to say that I've never really understood this analogy. I get it up to a point, but I also really push air from my diaphragm when I'm trying to start a fire (etc), the only real difference is that, as you say, when you blow like that you're pursing your lips. The diaphragm action is the same, it seems to me........

I think it has more to do with a focused or non focused air stream, and that has more to do with what happens in the mouth than what you do with the diaphragm.
 

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I think it has more to do with a focused or non focused air stream, and that has more to do with what happens in the mouth than what you do with the diaphragm.
Ooooooooooooooooo vs Eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
 

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I have to say that I've never really understood this analogy.
Nor me.

I've tried blowing air on my hand as if I'm misting up a window, and I've tried blowing with pursed lips. The only difference I can tell is the pressure and size of the airstream, same temperature. One is good for fogging a window, the other for starting a fire, but neither make much of a sound, for that I put a mouthpiece, reed and saxophone and blow as if I'm a saxophone player.

However if doing this helps you play the saxophone, then I have respect for doing it even though I don't understand it.

Perhaps this is because I've got used to using my diaphragm for every breath I take, whether I'm starting a fire, fogging a window or whatever, there is no difference in temperature.
 

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You mentioned in a different thread that you have a teacher.
What do they say you should use?

Personally, I prefer body temperature air. I blow this 'neutral temperature' air harder/faster to play louder, and softer/slower to play quieter.
My tongue moves around a little to help with focus and intonation, but generally speaking the air temp is still pretty close to body temp.
 

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You think that pursing your lips and blowing harder makes the air colder? It doesn't - it feels colder because it evaporates the sweat on your hand. Your sax will only know the difference if it sweats a lot.
 

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Oooooooooooo, now I seeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee!
I don't seeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee. I find it hard to think of an "eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee" while playing, the corners of my mouth would be pushed way out. I think (and articulate) doo, or too , but never tee or deee, or even wheeeeeee.

I still think if this works for people its not something I would poo poo (or pee pee?) there are many ways to teach and think about how we play, it's about whatever works I suppose and not expecting one system to fit everyone.
 

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i totally get this analogy. neither is right neither is wrong. i used both depending on what i want in my sound. however i tend to default to "warm". i find it opens my larynx and i get more projection and a warmer tone. experiment with it and settle on something that works.
 
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