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I found a 1937 Conn 6M a while back and earlier today I decided to start polishing away the corroded spots. After doing so I noticed under the corrosion, it was silver instead of yellow. Why is that?
 

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I can't tell from your photo, but if it's gold plate instead of lacquer, then it would have silver plate underneath the gold.
 

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I think it is the different color of the bare brass vs. gold lacquer which is darker.
Agree with bruce, it's just the bare brass underneath the gold lacquer which has darkened with age. If you continued to polish the area, the darker spots would brighten to a brass color.
 

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yes, it is brass, which is surprisingly light in color, this is why they ad coloring to lacquer otherwise it will look very pale.
 

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FWIW, I have a 1959 Selmer MKVI soprano that was lacquered by Selmer-Paris in France, then shipped to the USA where it was engraved through the factory lacquer (as reported by Douglas Pipher to me). The lacquer in the engraved area is gone. When I polish that area, the finish looks like silver in that area, but it is merely the original engraved bare brass. DAVE
 
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