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I recently came across a Selmer Tenor Sax, silver plated, serial 18*** and liked the sound of it even though it needs a complete overhaul. I don't know anything about the super/cigar cutter but found it to be more like a Conn. Anyway I am wondering how much a horn like that is worth? As I wrote it needs an overhaul and it also has some minor dents but it looks like the laquer is original. Your insights are much appreciated.
 

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I doubt if there is any lacquer on it unless someone in its history had it lacquered long after it came out of the factory. The Selmers of that era were very good horns. I do not know what it is worth, but that term is subjective. DAVE
 

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yes,silver-plated,not lacquered....
one doesn't see these come up all that often...what price are they asking for it?
what is the neck like?any pull-down damage/original too?...case...
cheers,philip
 

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It belongs to a school where I teach so I'm doing the research to see how much it's worth regardless of who ends up buying it. What is pull down damage? Do you mean damage that pulls down the price? There is an old case that comes with it.
 

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It has the "cigar cutter" body 8va mechanism which is pretty cool ..

Yeah.
You don't often see the tenors with the Cigar Cutter octave plate.
I have a slightly earlier one 16XXX Lacquered without the cigar cutter plate, fantastic horn.
I'd put a value of around $3000 on it even if requiring an overhaul.
Personally I think they're worth far more than that, but most on here tend to undervalue them.
I recently sold my early Conn 10M, which some people think sound similar to these Super tenors.
I found them to be completely different, with the Super being far better sounding in my opinion.
 

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It belongs to a school where I teach so I'm doing the research to see how much it's worth regardless of who ends up buying it. What is pull down damage? Do you mean damage that pulls down the price? There is an old case that comes with it.
The pull down damage refers to the neck having been bent downward at some point.
This can usually be seen in the form of a crease on the curved section, or the neck being more oval than round in this area.
Sometimes you can feel the crease even if not visible by gently feeling around the inside of the neck with you index finger.
 

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Pull-down happens when the neck is forced into the body of the horn by pushing on the mouthpiece/cork end or by trying to put the mouthpiece on a neck cork that may be a little too big while the neck is inserted in the body and again pulling down during the process. Basically it is bending the neck of the horn by mishandling the body, neck, and/or mouthpiece in some way that results in a bent or sometimes cracked neck.

Odd that a school would have an old horn like this. Was it recently donated by someone or just left and forgotten about in some closet or cubby-hole that nobody has looked in for years?

Edit: BFlat beat me too it --
 

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It does look a little bent in that photo.
maybe its just the angle?
Hi B flat, thanks for your replies. I guess it does look a little crooked in that picture. I only tried it for about 15 minutes the other day and wont have it until next wednesday where I will be sure to look for pull down damage and the overall shape of the horn. I appreciate your insights. I live in Denmark - don't know if that fact changes your assessment of the value of the horn..I just mean that prices differ a lot according to what country and continent you are purchasing in. Would you still regard 3000 fair it the body is in fact as bent as it looks like on the picture?
 

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Pull-down happens when the neck is forced into the body of the horn by pushing on the mouthpiece/cork end or by trying to put the mouthpiece on a neck cork that may be a little too big while the neck is inserted in the body and again pulling down during the process. Basically it is bending the neck of the horn by mishandling the body, neck, and/or mouthpiece in some way that results in a bent or sometimes cracked neck.

Odd that a school would have an old horn like this. Was it recently donated by someone or just left and forgotten about in some closet or cubby-hole that nobody has looked in for years?

Edit: BFlat beat me too it --
You got it - A guy came in the other day and simply donated it as a gift for the school. Now the school is considering hanging it on the wall, but as a saxophone player I of course don't like the thought of a good and rare selmer sax just haging somewhere with no use.
 

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Not sure if being in Denmark would affect the value or not.
I only based that estimate of $3000 on what I paid for mine a few years ago.
May be worth considerably more now though.
 

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A horn's value is difficult to assess. It is only as valuable as that one special buyer will pay for it. Its value depends on finding that one buyer and the timing is crucial.

Example . . . years ago I paid probably too much for a gold-plated Selmer Cigar Cutter alto. It was a wonderful player but it looked a little rough. I wanted it - so I paid the price. I doubt if I could sell it for anything close to what I paid for it. My purchase price doesn't mean the horn will draw that price again.

Just review the FOR-SALE section here on SOTW . . . seemingly desirable instruments start out priced pretty high and then the reductions start.

Of course, you can get a ballpark price so as to weigh the cost of an overhaul against the horn's value, or to seek insurance for it, but even then, I wouldn't count on getting that price if you listed it for sale. I suspect an alto of similar vintage would bring more than a tenor of the same vintage, especially early 1930's Selmers. Seems to me that popular vintage tenors are MKVI's and Conn 10M's, whereas popular vintage altos are more diverse. I could be wrong . . . DAVE
 
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