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I'm not sure what the current rates are for silver plating...but if you want the entire sax plated you will absolutely have to have it overhauled as well (it would have to be stripped of all pads/cork/felt etc. before being plated).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, answers my question; I don't need a repad. My tenor has been bead blasted and is nasty dirty, turning black with grime; I can't keep it clean, hence the though to silver plate it. Plays wonderfully, a 103K Mark VI.
 

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Indistinguishable Resident Buescher Bigot and Foru
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Not to mention that you won't solve the horn turning black and grungy by plating it in silver.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
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Thanks, answers my question; I don't need a repad. My tenor has been bead blasted and is nasty dirty, turning black with grime; I can't keep it clean, hence the though to silver plate it. Plays wonderfully, a 103K Mark VI.
Smoke? Sea air? What do you think is causing it?

Silver plate may add the issue of tarnish to your troubles. Lacquer or gold plate would be better choices in that regard.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/Sax Historian
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Both relacquering and replating in gold are problematic these days. Relacquering usually lowers market value. Re-golding is seriously expensive and the gold is occasionally prone to peel.

Tarnish polishes away. I don't think replated VIs suffer the value drop that relacquered ones do (tho there was some question whether original lacquer might be worth more than original silver due to some superstition or other!)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
What is causing this? I don't know, but I think it is partly due to the bead blasting process. I have a friend, in a different, less humid climate, who has a sandblasted (Earthtone) tenor, and it seems that dirt just seems to stick to it. It's like gummy somehow. My major concern at this point is that there are places around the key cups that are turning green with corrosion; that is why I am considering having the horn plated. Since this thread may be dead, I'm going to start another under the title corrosion, to see what else might be able to be done to remedy this.
 

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Grafton + TH & C alto || Naked Lady 10M || TT soprano || Martin Comm III
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What is causing this? I don't know, but I think it is partly due to the bead blasting process. I have a friend, in a different, less humid climate, who has a sandblasted (Earthtone) tenor, and it seems that dirt just seems to stick to it. It's like gummy somehow. My major concern at this point is that there are places around the key cups that are turning green with corrosion; that is why I am considering having the horn plated. Since this thread may be dead, I'm going to start another under the title corrosion, to see what else might be able to be done to remedy this.
I would stick with the same thread, it's not dead.

Silver plate does tarnish, quite quickly under some conditions. And when it does it's very difficult to get the shine back if the finish is rough, it tends to always be a bit grey at best. I would be tempted to go with the earlier suggestion of having it gold plated.

Are the keys also bead blasted? If not you could keep those silver and they will polish up nicely and not need a repad if just the body is plated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I would stick with the same thread, it's not dead.

Silver plate does tarnish, quite quickly under some conditions. And when it does it's very difficult to get the shine back if the finish is rough, it tends to always be a bit grey at best. I would be tempted to go with the earlier suggestion of having it gold plated.

Are the keys also bead blasted? If not you could keep those silver and they will polish up nicely and not need a repad if just the body is plated.
The keys are not bead blasted, but they are pitted/tarnished; the tenor was a relaq.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2016
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Doc Frazier also.....

What I am trying to figure is....was the horn blasted before or after the relacquer ? And...why the hell would anyone do that, regardless of before or after...?

And, yes...what's with this thread being 'dead' ?...it's all of 4 days old....

You go silverplate, you do the entire horn, keys and all, or obviously it'll look very silly...so, yes, VSG is correct...the current pads, corks, felts... are toast if you decide to plate.
 

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You go silverplate, you do the entire horn, keys and all, or obviously it'll look very silly


Not really (IMO) I had a silver plated Adolph Sax alto with lacquered brass keys, it looked great. My current R & C tenor has brass keys over silver bell (and bronze body), also looks great.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
To answer someone's question, I had it beadblasted out of ignorance. It was an ugly relacq, I was putting some money into a repad and wanted it stripped, and the tech recommended this option. Meanwhile, what do I do to prevent/corrrect the corrosion, that is, the green rot around some of the tone holes? This worries me, and is why I am considering the plating option.
 
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