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If I have the sheet music for the vocals of a song transposed specifically for sax, and figure out how to play the guitar section (on a guitar) either by looking at tabs or midi , how can I get them into the same key so that it will sound right when played together? Can I just slap a capo on the guitar somewhere or is it more complicated than that? I'm a decent player but have trouble wrapping my head around theory stuff...
 

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which horn? eb or Bb?
 

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Generally speaking tab, being keyless, is a direct translation of the recorded version of the song. If the person who transposed the vocal version for your sax used the same reference recording, then it will all work out. If the song needed a capo, it would indicate on the tab.

It really depends on the transposed vocals, and what source they were using. It is normally easier to alter your sax part than the guitar part though, depending on range limitations for your horn. Yes you can use a capo, but only for raising the key if the guitar part has open chords. Otherwise, the guitarist has to learn a whole new sequence.

It depends on the skill of the guitarist/horn player!
 

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If the sax is playing in C, then the other instruments play in Eb.

IF the other instruments are in Eb, then the sax plays in C.

So, theoretically, if a sax is playing in E, then a guitar would need to be in G. A capo could be used on the third fret in this case.
 

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If the vocal lead sheet has been transposed for a Bb sax and then the
sax reads off that sheet you will need to lower the guitar part by one whole
tone (2 semitones) to be in the same key as the sax.

When a Bb sax plays a written 'C', the note that actually comes out
of the sax is a concert Bb. The octave will depend on which Bb sax it is,
tenor or soprano.

If, on the other hand a vocal lead sheet is transposed for an Eb sax, then
you will need to play the guitar part 3 semitones higher to match the sax.

When an Eb sax plays a written 'C', the note that actually comes out
of the sax is a concert Eb. The octave will depend on which Eb sax it is,
alto or bari.

The easy solution would be for the guitar to read off the original vocal lead
sheet that was used as the basis for the transposing to sax key. If you
have it that is.
 
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