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Discussion Starter #1
I am wondering what type of bit is generally used in a rotary tool/flex shaft to sign the mpc with initials/logo and the mpc specs at the end of a job. Is it a very small ball point tip? If not, which one do you normally use? I have seen this done before but am not familiar with the bit type... I have a very fine pointed cone shape metal bit but that actually doesn't work very well... Thinking a very small diamond ball point or something (I've seen these really cheap at Harbor Freight and such) might fit the bill? Thanks!
 

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I use a tool I just sharpened to a fine point. Unless you know what you are doing or have really good gear they can get away from you.
Its done the job well enough for years.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
thanks Phil! that helps, i may try that. i've tried Xacto knives before but couldn't make those work very well. i've seen this done with the rotary tool before and it works really well, but will give the homeade fine point tool a shot if i can't find the right bit for the rotary tool. cheers.
 

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In harbor freight cheapo file set there is a 3 sided file that comes to a point. I sharpened that and it works fine. If you come up with something that lets you write small and with accuracy let me know. I just cant see writing with a flex shaft tool.
 

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Oh, here it is Phil, I think I found where the memory came from... This may not work exactly right for brass, I don't really know, but in this video beginning right at the 3:00 minute mark (you can scroll the movie play reel over to 3 minutes from the beginning, just click and drag) the guy here switches his flex shaft over to a very small diamond ball point bit and draws on whatever that thing is he's working on... I wonder if this would work on brass/hard rubber. I use the flex shaft all the time for random stuff, but don't have one of these bits. Might see if the local hardware store does though... What do you think Phil? Here's the vid: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RRutT5UXRbI
 

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I am not sure how to phrase this without being Martysaxed. How about..his engraver works better than mine. I have the old original flex tool that came with the dremel, it doest flex much.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
hahaha that's funny... man. well, i dunno, there's a harbor freight around here and i think they have diamond bits for like a few bucks... might give it a try, and will let you know how it goes, but I will also definitely check out that method that you use for writing on the pieces with a sharpened file. I am pretty sure I've got one of those cheapie 3-sided pointed files around here somewhere that you mentioned, and will give that a go if the diamond bit doesn't work out.
 

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I just use a blue needle spring held in a pin vise. But I can only do short straight lines with it. Hence my font evolved from what i could do with this set-up.
 

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This tool is available at Sears, and probably many places that sell tools. The tip is very fine and made with carbide. The body of it is 6" long and about 1/4" diameter-much like a slim pen. With some practice one could learn to write and print with it. Touted for marking/etching any material. I've used it on glass, HR, plastic and brass. Cost about $6.00. Probably be great for mpcs. View attachment 28076
 

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Discussion Starter #12
these are all great ideas, thanks a lot for sharing. i will be looking into these things. might give the pin vise/needle spring a shot later as i have those around already. Thomas, that's a nifty looking tool, will be on the lookout for one. didn't know dremel makes a cheap engraver.
 

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Wow spendy, I could spend over 500 bucks and handwriting would still look like chicken scratch. That is one reason I try to sign very small.

I personally dont mind a small signature. I dislike when people dig into a piece very large and deep.

The cheaper and neater way to go is to get a low powered heat stamp (for HR). I have entertained that. It would always look the same.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Hey Brian! How's it goin man! Thanks for the nice words... Yes, actually I have gotten into refacing mouthpieces, since about the beginning of last year. Just started doing some work for other people this year, and am now working on building a small addition to my website for it this week in hopes of expanding a bit. I just started building the website last night so there's almost nothing on it ha, but am hoping to finish it in the next few days. It's located at: http://www.mattmarantz.com/Site/Mouthpieces.html I've also got a temporary gallery set-up which is also in the beginning stages of organization ha, but if you want to take a look at it it's at: http://gallery.me.com/mattmarantz#100005 I'd be happy to email you a few sound clips of some pieces I've worked on if you're interested! What's your email?
By the way, how's everything been going for you Brian? How is life after UNT? Are you living in Austin nowadays? Talk to you later,

Matt
 

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The tool I have found that works best for text on mouthpieces is the vibrating type with a round metal point. They usually have a knob that allows you to adjust the vibration strength. The more rough the vibration, the deeper the cut, but harder to control. On a metal mouthpiece this can be a little tricky.

In the past, I have had some requests to engrave mouthpieces decoratively, but for the most part they are impossible to do without using an "airgraver" or "GRS tool" to do it and I am sort of philosophically opposed to using those tools because I am a Luddite. Plus there is the extreme difficulty holding the work. One slip and you have a lovely new hole in your left hand. And for the amount you charge to do that kind of work it isn't worth the risk. Sax necks have the same pitfalls so I almost never do them anymore.
 

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Brendan Tibbs uses a sharp cutting tool and does all his engraving manually by hand on his mouthpieces.
He's 'getting on a bit in years' so he has gone from engraving the full "Brendan Tibbs" to just "B. Tibbs" in his usual script font (and can help date his 'pieces)...
He holds the tool steady and moves the mouthpiece...

KennyD
 

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I just send my mouthpieces to the Ghost of Frank Kaspar and let him sign my mouthpieces for me. They command a higher price that way and nobody knows the difference. :)
 
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