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Grafton + TH & C alto || Naked Lady 10M || TT soprano || Martin Comm III
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Yes, it can be good to memorise as much as possible, as long as you are doing it efficiently.

Or are you just trying to memorise by remembering the notes while repeating over and over?

If so this is a poor method IMO.

For short licks it's better to analyse and remember intervals between notes and/or their relation to the root. For longer pieces you need to analyse the form or structure, look out for repeated melodic motifs, developed motifs (developed either melodically or rhythmically), melodic contours and melodic sequences. This way you remember a motif, then just recall that and add the development to it.

An example of a sequence:

C E F E | D F G F

Different intervals, but the sequence uses the same melodic contour and transposes diatonically, ie within the C scale rather than being a direct transposition up a tone, which would be:

C E F E | D F# G F#

That's an example of the way my mind is working when I memorise.
 

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Out of Office
Grafton + TH & C alto || Naked Lady 10M || TT soprano || Martin Comm III
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30,105 Posts
Yes I memorized them, The problem for me with the nr thing is that it doesn't work when you have a lick with a lot of chromatics.
Good point, it gets harder the more chromatic notes, but the better you get your theory knowledge and are able to analyse extensions and alterations, the easier it is to memorise the more complex stuff.

However along with the numbers you may need to think the alterations, b13 etc or remember snatches of scales. So on a G7, I would think of G F# F E D Db as part of a a descending bebop scale ending on b5.

The problem comes when something is completely atonal.
 
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