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Discussion Starter #1
I recently decided on the blue yeti mic to record sax along with other instruments and some vocals. Is the shockmount a necessity? I'll probably buy a mic stand and put the yeti on it directly. The shockmount is $70 which is close to the price of the mic ($90)! What are the pros and cons of a shockmount? Do the vibrations really affect the recording? Any other information on shockmounts would be great!

Thanks!
Brad
 

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The shock mount will isolate any mechanical noise (vibrations) from travelling up the mic stand or even mic cable and transferring to the diaphragm of the mic resulting in extra noises (bumps, strikes...)

If you're recording vocal or sax on a firm floor, a low cut filter around 75Hz should take care of most stuff.

But if you're doing drums or even a bass guitar, that low end is going to travel right to that diaphragm and make the mic sound unfocused or noisy.

Buy the mic (it's a decent USB mic) and if you feel you are getting too much extra noise, get the shock mount.

I'd say that you should be fine without it though.
 

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A shockmount will significantly reduce "boomy" lo-freq vibrations. Doesn't eliminate "clackey" mid/high-freq sounds.
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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I use mics with and without shock mounts in my studio, they can be useful if you are escorting very quiet things as the mic gain needs to be high and so the mic will pick up more sensitively, e.g footsteps, knocking the stand etc. however for recording saxophones I don't find them necessary. If you knock the stand it will clunk whether you have a shock mount or not.

If you have a hard floor, then you may want to put the stand on a piece of matting or foam.

If you are going to be recording singers also, then a pop shield would be more of a priority.
 

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It will also get rid of foot tapping. But it's not worth it for that mic.

Foot tapping on a hardwood floor can sound like distant thunder in your recordings, without a shock mount. But, I agree, that mic isn't worth it, probably. To get rid of annoying foot tapping, take shoes off, put down a rug under the foot, and/or put the person being recorded onto a high stool, on which their feet can't reach the floor (that's what I had to do to myself before the shock mounts).

Most of the great mics come with shock mounts. If you're considering the purchase of a studio mic for a couple of hundred dollars or more, and it doesn't come with a shockmount, choose another mic. After market shock mounts don't always fit. Even my Blue Spark (which is a good mic, but not great) at $200 comes with a shockmount. But, for another $50 you can get a truly great mic, with a very solid shockmount ... sE2200 (from Sweetwater).

With great mics in a small, well done studio ... everything will get recorded, even the quartz clock on the wall .... And that's not even at high gain settings. Great mics pick up everything around them and need effective shock mounts for clean recordings.


Turtle
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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Foot tapping on a hardwood floor can sound like distant thunder in your recordings, without a shock mount. But, I agree, that mic isn't worth it, probably. To get rid of annoying foot tapping, take shoes off, put down a rug under the foot, and/or put the person being recorded onto a high stool, on which their feet can't reach the floor (that's what I had to do to myself before the shock mounts).
Exactly. If you are in control of your recording area, ie you aren't catering to fussy clients who insist on wearing stiletto heels on a wooden floor, then you can perfectly well solve any issues with a couple of rugs.
 

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Exactly. If you are in control of your recording area, ie you aren't catering to fussy clients who insist on wearing stiletto heels on a wooden floor, then you can perfectly well solve any issues with a couple of rugs.
OK, OK, I'll take the heels off next time!
 
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