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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all, anyone else with a 66R tenor noticed that the high F sharp is exactly that-very sharp! Makes no difference if you use front fingering or palm key fingering, it's so sharp that I can't use my throat or embouchure to get it back down. I know that there is a tendency for these high notes to be a bit sharp on some horns, but anyone else come accross on a 66R, and any suggestions to get round it?
Cheers!
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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Are you using the horn's F# fingering or the old altissimo F#. I tend to ignore F# keys and use the altissimo fingering: aux F plus side Bb with or without RH1.

Or, if you want to use the high F# key, check that it isn't opening too far, if so build up the cork or use a new one.
 

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as pete saysmtry shimming the key down by adding cork or felt underneath the key, when the key opens too much it has the effect of moving the tonenhole closer to the neck and driving the pitch. palm key heights is one of the common things that people setting up saxophones seem to not understand (based upon my obversatiosn on all of the horns that come through my bench).
 

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High F sharp is in tune on my Pf flier/66r. But that is not the case with high E! Way too sharp, the cure is to release the high Eb key.
That is actually a workaround rather than a cure I think, in that you should not have to use unconventional fingerings to get the intonation you want.
 

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Ok, so what to do then? D,F and F sharp is fine though. Have to make it work, right?
The right hand high E side key could be opening too much, but closing it a bit could make the high F flat. When I played a Mark V1 alto I played high E and F without the Eb key as my regular fingering.
 

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Hi all, anyone else with a 66R tenor noticed that the high F sharp is exactly that-very sharp! Makes no difference if you use front fingering or palm key fingering, it's so sharp that I can't use my throat or embouchure to get it back down. I know that there is a tendency for these high notes to be a bit sharp on some horns, but anyone else come accross on a 66R, and any suggestions to get round it?
Cheers!
Could be multiple things.

Mouthpiece design, Mouthpiece position on the neck, How the player is lipping or not lipping for intonation of a note, How the player is attacking and voicing the note with their airstream and oral impedance, reed choice, how far the Front F key opens, etc etc.

I've found that Altissimo intonation is very dependent on the above.

The basic Front F based F# fingering

Front F o x o | o o o side Bb

works pretty well on all my Altos and Tenors but is dependent on the above and using other weird fingerings is not really needed and simple Altissimo fingerings are the way to go if anyone wants to play Altissimo notes in a similar way to the usual notes.

This is what the Classical players like Eugene Rousseau and others do.

The Classical players don't have weird awkward fingerings for Altissimo as there are Classical Altissimo passages that need to be played like the usual notes and some Jazz players do the same.

Usually it's the Front F based fingerings for Altissimo F# to Ab and then the well known Altissimo A fingering and the Altissimo Bb is a small variation of the Altissimo A fingering and the Atissimo B to Altissimo D are the palm key fingerings and with a bit of practice, these fingerings join into each other in a fluent sort of way to enable fast Altissimo playing and fine adjustment of the Altissimo fingerings intonation is done by technique and also maybe some gear setup, as above.
 

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As Pete suggests, simply increase the thickness of cork on your palm keys. When I got my 67R the high D, E, F, F# were so sharp I couldn't lip them down. Replacing the corks cured the problem immediately and completely.
 

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The right hand high E side key could be opening too much, but closing it a bit could make the high F flat. When I played a Mark V1 alto I played high E and F without the Eb key as my regular fingering.
Adjust your palm keys one by one going up from D

First make sure you are happy with general intonation on the main body of the horn, ie mouthpiece position and good mouthpiece/horn match (plenty of threads on that).

So if all else is OK and just one or some palm keys are out do this:

First check palm D. If sharp add more cork underneath. If flat shave a little cork off. NB when a horn is new, run it in a bit so the cork gets compressed.

Now do the same with Eb, E, F and F# if you have one, in that order.

Any palm key opening may affect one higher up, that's why you should start at the D and work up. So ,e.g. if E and F are sharp, fix the E first.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for all interesting replies, guys. Is there an optimal opening measurement for the palm keys (seem to remember seeing a Yamaha guide somewhere), or is it just a question of trial and error?
 
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