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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking for advise from more experienced Keilwerth Tenor players on the issue of the D playing sharp. I am an amateur. playing for 6 years, but only a little over one year on tenor (exclusively tenor now). My low D plays 15-20 cents sharp compared to the neighboring notes but I can change my embouchure to bring it into tune with a nice quality tone. Mid D (Low D fingering + octave key) is 20-30 cents sharp and no matter what I do I cannot play it in tune with a quality tone...if I get it in tune with a tuner then the quality of tone is total crap (thin, airy, much lower volume than other notes). I cannot get it right with my embouchure strength.

My tech has gone over the horn and verified it is in great shape, both he and my instructor have the same issue on the horn though perhaps not to the same extent (have not measured it). My tech suggests switching to the Warburton neck or changing the horns elbow dimensions or moving the tone hole...all of which seem extreme to me. I can't really believe that Keilwerth makes a horn that simply can't be played in tune without major changes.

Do the Keilwerth experts out there have any suggestions for how to improve this? Perhaps a mouthpiece change would help? Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Equipment: Keilwerth Shadow SX90R tenor
Mpc: Otto Link Tone Edge 7 (.100 tip opening)
reed: 3 Alexander NY

I have tried a Saxscape Xtra Dark .102 ans also a Warburton LA 8* (.115) with similar results. Also tried Fibracell and Legere reeds with similar results.
 

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I'm just curious...did you try it with the mpc that it comes with? If any mpc will make a difference, you'd think that the Keilwerth mpc would work....
 

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I'm not sure, I'm really an amateur, but I know that on my YAS-23 I have the same problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have tried very briefly the Keilwerth Jazz mouthpiece that came with the horn and it did seem to show the same level of issue, but I did not take more time to see if I could reduce the issue by further adjustments to Mpc location or reed selection.
 

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D2 is a historically bad note on Keilwerth tenors. I've gotten into the habit of playing D2 using the palm key. It's almost perfectly in tune. It's a little thinner than the regular fingering, so you have to adjust the airstream a bit. I saw a Clarence Clemons video once, and noticed he did the same thing.
 

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Lower the low C pad cup by turning the slot over felt. The lower the pad the flatter the note. Don't lower it too much or it will get stuffy. Middle D is a sharp note on all the saxes. Open your throat and voice the note flatter. I've hardly ever played a sax without a sharp middle D
 

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D2 is a historically bad note on Keilwerth tenors. I've gotten into the habit of playing D2 using the palm key. It's almost perfectly in tune. It's a little thinner than the regular fingering, so you have to adjust the airstream a bit. I saw a Clarence Clemons video once, and noticed he did the same thing.
Another fingering that works for me is substituting the D palm key for the octave key. Play low D press the D palm key instead of the octave key. Another fingering - play middle C and add the Eb palm key.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks everyone so far. Dorono...that is really great advice. I play long tones against a long tone recording but the tones are one at a time and about 20 seconds long which gives you plenty of time to adjust and think but doesn't necessarily imprint the embouchure changes needed between notes to play in tune.
 

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I play long tones against a long tone recording but the tones are one at a time and about 20 seconds long which gives you plenty of time to adjust and think but doesn't necessarily imprint the embouchure changes needed between notes to play in tune.
Yeah, long tones are great, but they don't really represent a realistic playing situation. Long tones are great to isolate the precise muscles needed to stay in tune while playing actual melodies along with a recording help you prepare for those real life musical situations.
 

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A cork crescent can be placed into the tone hole. The middle octave D will be more affected than the lower octave D.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Does the cork crescent need to be placed in any particular location....and are There any suggestions on thickness? Interesting idea.
 

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I usually use 3/64th", start at the beginning point of the tone-hole (towards the mouthpiece). Try a bit of masking tape first to get the right length. Curt may have some pictures in one of his articles: www.musicmedic.com
 
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