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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What do you guys think? Serial #727146 would date it to 2004-2005.

I believe its a fake. Without "subjective" comments, what "giveaways" or "clues" do you see from the pictures?

Thank you for your time.
 

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Fake, very fake, the logo is all wrong. The real selmer logo is no where near as thick.
 

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Fake, very fake, the logo is all wrong. The real selmer logo is no where near as thick.
Yes, I think so too. I had a Series II in the nineties and that looked different. Though it's difficult to say from a pic, this one looks, hm, well, rather cheap ....
 

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100% fake. The engraving, bell logos, neck logo, bell-to-bow and bow-to-body rings, thumbhook, F# key guard, LH table keys and clothes guard are all wrong. Modern Selmers also don't have that "MADE IN FRANCE" mark by the serial number.
 

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I think the main indicator though for these fakes is that, correct me if I am wrong, all of the stamps and engraving is done by laser etching. It looks printed. Whereas on a real selmer you can imagine someone smacking a selmer logo shaped stamp on the bell, hammer each number on the back and etch out the engraving with a hand tool. It all looks like someone took the time to put it there, not printed by the masses.

EDIT: Although that neck worries me, I can't tell the difference.
 

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On a Series II, there's a plate with "Super Action 80" stanped on it on the front of the neck. Also the octave key resembles Selmer's pre-Jubilee design, however the blue enamel is the darker shade seen on Jubilees only.
Yes, they botched the neck badly. Leaving off the nameplate is a huge omission.

However, judging from this pseudo-Series II and the recent fake 54, it's clear that the counterfeiters are trying much harder now to produce reasonable fascimiles of Selmer horns. This work is several levels above the practice of taking a sax with tiger stripes and blue key touches, calling it a Reference 54, and expecting some hapless numbskull to buy it for $600.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks for the replies everyone. I wanted to see if it was as obvious to you all, so I took pictures of the glaring problem spots.

I found this fake at a pawn shop who had actually paid a man top dollar for this instrument.

The 700,000s serial matches the age of the saxophone, so I thought it was interesting the fakes actually looked into proper time period serial numbers. However, after speaking with someone at Conn-Selmer, I was told Serie II saxes were never sold with serial 727,xxx (closest numbers being 724,xxx and 725,xxx).

The really amazing part is that the horn plays in tune (better than my YAS23) in upper and lower registers and actually sounds pretty decent. It doesn't sound anything like my Serie III and 54, but it does sound better than a student horn!
 

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Unfortunately, the fakes will get better. It's a double edged sword...educating buyers on the problems with the fake also educates the counterfeiters on what to do better.
 
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Unfortunately, the fakes will get better. It's a double edged sword...educating buyers on the problems with the fake also educates the counterfeiters on what to do better.
Well, the biggest problem with a fake is it's illegal to buy, own or sell one. If buyers were educated to the extent that they knew that, then I think that would only harm the counterfeiters. The problem is that counterfeiting is rife and many just accept it and think it is good way to appear to own a designer product that they can't afford.
 
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