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Selmer posted another ad about the supreme... and completely neglected women saxophonists. Again.

Doew anyone else notice this regularly in the industry? Obviously I’d like to hear women’s voices, but I know I’ve heard my fair share of sexism in the music biz.
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FWIW, I think that's just a result of translation from the French version (which almost certainly uses the indefinite pronoun "on"), to English, which does not really have a comparable pronoun (don't get me started on the singular "they"). I highly doubt that they intended to neglect female saxophonists.
 

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The English we old folks learned in grade school called for “he or him” when referring to a person or person(s) in general. edited 4/7/21

Everyone should plan for his future.

In the last twenty or so years that has changed to “his or her” or the once unacceptable “their” . I suspect the problem is in the translation. Maybe whoever wrote the ad copy isn’t aware of the changes in English pronoun usage and is going by the book.
 

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The English we old folks learned in grade school called for “he or him” when referring to a person or person in general.

Everyone should plan for his future.

In the last twenty or so years that has changed to “his or her” or the once unacceptable “their” . I suspect the problem is in the translation. Maybe whoever wrote the ad copy isn’t aware of the changes in English pronoun usage and is going by the book.
This is true for even the not so old. I'm in my early 40's and this is what I was taught.

These days I have to be somewhat mindful of this (I'm a university professor), but what I do is to either use "his/her" or simply "her" to be safe when the subject is of indefinite gender. I haven't run into issues with either.
 

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This is true for even the not so old. I'm in my early 40's and this is what I was taught.

These days I have to be somewhat mindful of this (I'm a university professor), but what I do is to either use "his/her" or simply "her" to be safe when the subject is of indefinite gender. I haven't run into issues with either.
It's gotten a little bit out of hand. You are not supposed to say mankind anymore, an actress is now a "female actor" and gender attributes are "assigned" where they were never intended to be. I am just waiting for Neil Armstrong's words "That's one small step for [a] man, one giant leap for mankind." to be censored as sexist
 

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FWIW, I think that's just a result of translation from the French version (which almost certainly uses the indefinite pronoun "on"), to English, which does not really have a comparable pronoun (don't get me started on the singular "they"). I highly doubt that they intended to neglect female saxophonists.
Selmer Paris is sexist! 😢🤪🤣
 

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It's gotten a little bit out of hand. You are not supposed to say mankind anymore, an actress is now a "female actor" and gender attributes are "assigned" where they were never intended to be. I am just waiting for Neil Armstrong's words "That's one small step for [a] man, one giant leap for mankind." to be censored as sexist
Lmao oh god it's coming!


To the OP, I'm all for equality and standing for a decent cause, but this is clearly just from translation. Don't go looking for inappropriate reasons to be upset - it sets a poor tone and undermines the cause.
 

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M is correct. If you use a literal trasnlator with French some objects will be considered a "He", Some a "She".

That said there is considerable consternation in France regarding some of the use of language.
Female activists were preturbed (to say the least) that "Covid" was determined to be feminine or female.
When you compare a virus killing millions to Selmer's possible oversight Selmer's error lookes a wee bit smaller.
 

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I don't find the ad to be sexist - saxist maybe, but not sexist.

It is true that they could have used "him or her", but I doubt that they meant to neglect women artists. Especially when they have many women artists as endorsers: Beyond the sound - artists
 

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If the ad said musicienne, she'd choose an instrument to suit her.
But watch the recent multi-artist mini-concert at Andorra Sax Fest to promote the Supreme--several fabulous women players although indeed a minority. The pianist comping was Delangles wife.
 

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An actress is not a "female actor," which would imply that the norm for actors is male & that any females in that profession are exceptions requiring an adjective. An actress is an actor: one who acts. Likewise, a woman who plays the saxophone is not a "female sax player." She's a sax player.

The Selmer Supreme web promo does feature several women as player/endorsers... but you have to scroll quite deeply into the list before you encounter them.
 

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An actress is not a "female actor," which would imply that the norm for actors is male & that any females in that profession are exceptions requiring an adjective.
Sure, if you're intent on finding offense.

Otherwise, it could just represent a clarification in light of the fact that, until very recently, the term "actor" has been used to refer almost exclusively to male actors. In fact it's still the case for almost all of the major acting awards (i.e., the Academy Awards, BAFTAs, Emmy's, etc. still use terms like "best actor" to refer exclusively to male actors and the term "actress" to refer to female actors), though SAG now uses "Male Actor" and "Female Actor", respectively (gasp, those monsters!).
 

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Or they could open the "best actor" category to all genders, & make it about raw acting talent, not gender identity. Of course, doing that would make more sense if casting were more equitable, decisionmakers were more representative of a diverse population, gendered roles were less stereotypical, & so forth.

The point of changing outmoded, overly restrictive terminology is to challenge ways of thinking that deny opportunity or equal status to talented, deserving folks.
 

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Or they could open the "best actor" category to all genders, & make it about raw acting talent, not gender identity.
No one who's actually in the business wants that, because it would cut the number of acting awards in half.
 

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Or they could increase the number of acting awards proportionally.
And undermine the value of the award?

Splitting hairs here, we're really discussing a translation issue. Inherent sexism exists though, and it's not being denied. the movements are surely helping get rid of these statements, but its Just not really applicable to this scenario
 
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